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NF-Lee's Gildor and Frodo

Riv. 9 ~ Council of Elrond 3: ‘I will take it’, plus “Heir to the Dreamer”.

Posted on 2008.12.01 at 15:06
Tags: , , , ,
~*~

I’ve mentioned regularly during this Rivendell series how much reading the chapters again has reminded me of Bilbo’s importance as a character in the story, in spite of not actually being in it very much, and of the warmth of his relationship with Frodo. Tolkien doesn’t spell out the history of that relationship here (or anywhere, really), but their mutual regard is implied everywhere. So is the depth of Bilbo’s feelings, even if he doesn’t express them directly. As Gandalf remarks after Bilbo offers to take the Ring, “we do not doubt that under jest you are making a valiant offer”. Bilbo, in the manner of hobbits, often will say serious things lightly. How I would love to have seen this scene played, and played well.

Jan-u-wine has written a beautiful poem, Heir to the Dreamer, that moves me very much. Written from Bilbo’s point of view in the year he decides to take Frodo to live with him and be his heir, it lets us look inside the story of their relationship. It gives us a vision of the origins of the love that would move Bilbo, at one hundred and twenty-eight, living in idyllic retirement, to volunteer to go to Mordor in order to spare his heir.

The poem follows the screencaps, which illustrate one of my favourite moments in the film. Frodo, small and unnoticed in the midst of all the uproar, steps forward, volunteering to carry the Ring to Mordor. The fragmented arguments of the assembly continue. Frodo's offer is made a second time, in a louder voice. Gandalf’s reaction, when he hears Frodo's words, moves me to the depths. My heart melts at the sight of his love mixed with grief. It is only a brief close-up, but Gandalf's face shows how clearly he knows what Frodo will be taking on, volunteering to go to Mordor.


~*~


Book scene: from The Council of Elrond.

There was a silence. At last Elrond spoke again.

‘This is grievous news concerning Saruman,’ he said; ‘for we trusted him and he is deep in all our counsels. It is perilous to study too deeply the arts of the Enemy, for good or for ill. But such falls and betrayals, alas, have happened before. Of the tales that we have heard this day the tale of Frodo was most strange to me. I have known few hobbits, save Bilbo here; and it seems to me that he is perhaps not so alone and singular as I had thought him. The world has changed much since I last was on the westward roads.

[They then discuss what might be done with the Ring. It can’t go to Bombadil, can’t stay in Imladris, can’t be sent over the Sea. Erestor concludes they must either hide it for ever, or unmake it—but how might that be done? Elrond speaks.]

‘[I]t seems to me now clear which is the road that we must take. The westward road seems easiest. Therefore it must be shunned. It will be watched. Too often the Elves have fled that way. Now at this last we must take a hard road, a road unforeseen. There lies our hope, if hope it be. To walk into peril—to Mordor. We must send the Ring to the Fire.

Silence fell again. Frodo, even in that fair house, looking out upon a sunlit valley filled with the noise of clear waters, felt a dead darkness in his heart.

[Boromir proposes that they use the Ring for their own ends, but Elrond reminds him that it would be impossible, the Ring being altogether evil. Glóin asks whether the remaining lesser rings of power might be united against Sauron. Gandalf tells how Thráin’s ring was taken from him in torment in Dol Guldur. What then of the Three? Sadly Elrond explains that even though the Three were not made by Sauron, if the One were recovered by Sauron, the thoughts of the keepers of the Three would be laid bare. Yet if the One were destroyed, the power of the Three might be destroyed along with It.]

‘Yet all the Elves are willing to endure this chance,’ said Glorfindel, ‘if by it the power of Sauron may be broken, and the fear of his dominion be taken away for ever.’

‘Thus we return once more to the destroying of the Ring,’ said Erestor, ‘and yet we come no nearer. What strength have we for the finding of the Fire in which it was made? That is the path of despair. Of folly I would say, if the long wisdom of Elrond did not forbid me.’

‘Despair or folly?’ said Gandalf. ‘It is not despair, for despair is only for those who see the end beyond all doubt. We do not. It is wisdom to recognize necessity, when all other courses have been weighed, though as folly it may appear to those who cling to false hope. Well, let folly be our cloak, a veil before the eyes of the Enemy! For he is very wise, and weighs all things to a nicety in the scales of his malice. But the only measure that he knows is desire, desire for power; and so he judges all hearts. Into his heart the thought will not enter that any will refuse it, that having the Ring we may seek to destroy it. If we seek this, we shall put him out of reckoning.’

‘At least for a while, said Elrond. ‘The road must be trod, but it will be very hard. And neither strength nor wisdom will carry us far upon it. This quest may be attempted by the weak with as much hope as the strong. Yet such is oft the course of deeds that move the wheels of the world: small hands do them because they must, while the eyes of the great are elsewhere.’

‘Very well, very well, Master Elrond!’ said Bilbo suddenly. ‘Say no more! It is plain enough what you are pointing at. Bilbo the silly hobbit started this affair, and Bilbo had better finish it, or himself. I was very comfortable here, and getting on with my book. If you want to know, I am just writing an ending for it. I had thought of putting: and he lived happily ever afterwards to the end of his days. It is a good ending, and none the worse for having been used before. Now I shall have to alter that: it does not look like coming true; and anyway there will evidently have to be several more chapters, if I live to write them. It is a frightful nuisance. When ought I to start?’

Boromir looked in surprise at Bilbo, but the laughter died on his lips when he saw that all the others regarded the old hobbit with grave respect. Only Glóin smiled, but his smile came from old memories.

‘Of course, my dear Bilbo,’ said Gandalf. ‘If you had really started this affair, you might be expected to finish it. But you know well enough now that starting is too great a claim for any, and that only a small part is played in great deeds by any hero. You need not bow! Though the word was meant, and we do not doubt that under jest you are making a valiant offer. But one beyond your strength, Bilbo. You cannot take this thing back. It has passed on. If you need my advice any longer, I should say that your part is ended, unless as a recorder. Finish your book, and leave the ending unaltered! There is still hope for it. But get ready to write a sequel, when they come back.’

Bilbo laughed. ‘I have never known you give me pleasant advice before,’ he said. ‘As all your unpleasant advice has been good, I wonder if this advice is not bad. Still, I don’t suppose I have the strength or the luck left to deal with the Ring. It has grown, and I have not. But tell me: what do you mean by they?

‘The messengers who are sent with the Ring.’

‘Exactly! And who are they to be? That seems to me what this Council has to decide, and all that it has to decide. Elves may thrive on speech alone, and Dwarves may endure great weariness; but I am only an old hobbit, and I miss my meal at noon. Can’t you think of some names now? Or put it off till after dinner?’


~*~



Film scene:


[Frodo, still seated as the assembly argues, watches the Ring. On it he sees reflected the images of the assembly engulfed in conflict, while the voice of the Ring repeats the "Ash nazg" incantation).]

Gandalf: Heard over the tumult: Do you not understand? While you bicker amongst yourselves, Sauron's power grows! None can escape it! You will all be destroyed!

[Frodo rises to speak and tries to make himself heard over the crowd.]

Frodo: I will take it! I will take it!

[Gandalf hears and reacts first, then the rest. They all stop talking and turn to look at Frodo.]














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Heir to the Dreamer

~ by jan-u-wine


It cannot be nine years they are gone.

It cannot be the lad grows,
yet
grows no better.

It was Yule
when last I chanced
to see him,

Yule,
and the great Hall filled
with warmth and light...

chock-a-block
with feasting
and couples a-courting
in sweet-shadowed corners.

Bright brown brew,
and fresh-pressed cider,
mulled spicy-hot
from cook's vast black kettle,
wended pleasant down many
a throat.

I admit,

I had sampled more than a pint
or two
of honey-tipped ale
when I spied him.

If laugher were a Sea,
it were a Sea broken
and ended
by the silence of that shore.

I could not help but see
the quiet of my cousin's eyes,
mirrored in his own,
nor the grace
that bespoke the 'faerie wife'
in that odd-slender form.

It was that night I gave him his father's pipe.

From the hollowed tusk of a mighty
oliphaunt,
it was,
bound in Elven-flowered silver

And the lad took it,
and became more quiet, still.

A nail-bitten thumb
followed the curve of the stem,

touched the bowl as if to tamp down
what was there only in imagination.

He turned from me then,
looked past diamond windows,
blazened with warmth and light,
to that which lay beyond.

The River.

Silenced by winter's breath, it was,
grey and stone-still,
cold as…….

This will not do.

No, this assuredly will not do.

He will not know another winter here,
I promise myself,

he will not know another season of despair.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Spring 1389.

Beyond the window of my study,
old Hamfast and his youngest,
(too small as yet to work the garden,
but not to be denied)
turn soil beneath the cloud-milked Sun.

The boy's feet carry him, in their excitement,
to my door.

A small hand enfolds two grey spheres,
round as marbles,
delicate-veined and shining against dirt-smeared fist.

He is not so old yet as to know what these might be,
but his eyes, green as old-willow bark,
round with wonder
as the creatures unfold upon his palm.

This lad.

And the other.

They have decided me.

In the fall of this year,
when the harvest is called home
(and before ever the river falls to chill'd sleep)

I shall call Home a harvest of a different sort….

a harvest of youth-awkward limbs and lonely heart,
a harvest of sea-dreams and eyes bemused by stars….

He shall be my heir,
this Elf-strange lad who shares the day of my birth.

And I will teach him what he must needs know:

which crop is sown in spring,
and which must wait for summer's heat…

what river feeds which farmer's land….

the proper tang of proper leaf…..
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~

The gold nib of my pen meets parchment,
twines words of salutation to those of invitation.

He will come, I know it.

He will come,
and live beneath the green of the Hill,
and dream of the moon-silvered Sea
in the room that was his father's.

He will come.

I have decided.











Previous entry:

~ Riv. 8: Council of Elrond 2 – ‘Never trust an Elf!', plus jan-u-wine’s 'Rivendell Suite 5’.

Next entry:

Photobucket ~ Riv. 10: Council of Elrond 4 – ‘Though I do not know the way’, plus jan-u-wine’s 'The Counsel of Elrond’.


Other Links:

~ Entries with jan-u-wine's poems.


~ Main table for all entries



~ Mechtild

Comments:


Shirebound
shirebound at 2008-12-01 21:55 (UTC) (Link)
I shall call Home a harvest of a different sort….

a harvest of youth-awkward limbs and lonely heart,
a harvest of sea-dreams and eyes bemused by stars…


Oh my, how wonderful!

I love exploring in my stories the bond between Bilbo and Frodo.
Mechtild
mechtild at 2008-12-01 23:49 (UTC) (Link)
Isn't that a great stanza? It makes me glow, but weepily.
Prim
primula_baggins at 2008-12-01 23:07 (UTC) (Link)
*cries* Jan's poem is heart wrenching!

I wonder if they misted Frodo's face in that scene? I never noticed before, but there is a bit of sweat on it.

Mechtild
mechtild at 2008-12-01 23:54 (UTC) (Link)
It's a beautiful imagining of Bilbo's inner thoughts as he reaches his decision, I agree. And it makes me weepy, too.

I wonder if they misted Frodo's face in that scene? I never noticed before, but there is a bit of sweat on it.

I don't know if they misted his face or not, but Blossom wrote to the previous entry regarding how much she loved EW's acting of Frodo's response to Gimli trying to smash the Ring. She noted how he seems to have taken the blow himself: he looks stricken and covered in sweat, she said, as if he were nauseous. The caps for this entry come immeditately upon those frames, only an eyeblink later, so I think we are seeing the working out of the same emotions.

Edited at 2008-12-01 11:55 pm (UTC)
Rakshi
rakshi at 2008-12-02 00:09 (UTC) (Link)
As always.. the two of you lift my heart and break it all in the same post.

Thank you both for these beautiful, touching posts.

Love...
Mechtild
mechtild at 2008-12-02 00:18 (UTC) (Link)
You're welcome, Rakshi. Thanks for stopping by! It's a very fine scene, but, I believe, made finer by the extra narrative depth Jan's beautiful poem provides.
pearlette
pearlette at 2008-12-02 13:12 (UTC) (Link)
If laughter were a Sea,
it were a Sea broken
and ended
by the silence of that shore.


Jan's phrasing is beautiful. A sad poem, because of young Frodo's loss, but ultimately heart-warming.

I love this scene in the film too. McKellan was so perfectly cast as Gandalf.
Mechtild
mechtild at 2008-12-02 14:17 (UTC) (Link)
Yes, perfectly cast. He brought so much, dare I say, *humanity* to the role. But surely he is the most human of maiar.

Yes, it is sad, but it ends well, and expressed beautifully. I adore Bilbo and the way she shows his thinking in this. I'd say that in this poem and others, Jan depicts young Frodo's suffering over his parents' drowning and the subsequent loss of them as something he felt intensely as a child. Something that had repercussions for him all his life. I have tended to think of Frodo more as one of those children who survive wars and other trauma to grow up normally, thanks to a kind and loving upbringing, for Frodo, at Brandy Hall and with Bilbo. But reading Jan's work has made me a lot more attentive to the sad strain the runs under Frodo's character.

I don't think Jan has ever listened to the BBC radio drama, but Frodo in her poems makes me think of Ian Holm's reading of Frodo in that production, in the opening sections, when he exhibits this subtle, underlying sadness. I'm thinking of when his Frodo is singing morosely over his glass before Gandalf reappears at Bag End, or the way he chants "The Road Goes Ever On and On" for the first time. It's so evocative, shot through with a sense of ... doom, and, I think, loneliness. I have attributed this mood in Frodo to his increasing sense of his [unhappy and unsettling] destiny creeping up on him. But Jan's poems have made me more open to the idea that Frodo *already* bore this strain of melancholy within him, before the Ring began to have a bearing on his life, a sad strain set to thrumming, if softly, at the death of his parents.
pearlette
pearlette at 2008-12-02 15:13 (UTC) (Link)
It was the board discussions, and fanfiction, which started me thinking deeply about the sad strain in Frodo's early life. Tolkien doesn't touch on it. But such an interpretation makes sense of Frodo's character or at least fits with his canon character. It also makes him more interesting, IMO. Tolkien almost treats Frodo like a blank slate before the fateful destiny of the Ring falls on him. In the early part of FotR, Frodo almost comes across like another Bilbo: a comfortable English bachelor. It takes the reader a little time to realise that actually he is very different from Bilbo: more introverted, more thoughtful and contemplative.

I like the angstier interpretations of Frodo, as long as the angst isn't overdone. (I am not a big fan of too much Frodo- angst, since I get ridiculously upset about a character I love suffering more than he does in the book!)

For me, Frodo and Harry are similar sorts of heroes. I don't mean they are at all similar in personality: Frodo thinks deeply and is a very mature person, Harry tends to Open Mouth Before Engaging Brain. :p I mean similar in the kind of hero they are: the ordinary guy who does something truly extraordinary. They also demonstrate Love rather than raw Power. Harry gets dissed by some of the fandom for being a shallow hero. I don't agree. The kid is not as screwed up as he would be in RL, because of his abusive upbringing by the Dursleys, but he has a dark, morbid sense of humour and is somewhat emotionally stunted. Which makes him far more interesting in my eyes than if he were emotionally well-adjusted. ;)

I can cope with a bit of Harry-angst too. Actually, I can cope with quite a LOT of Harry-angst. ;)

On quite another note, the splendidly angsty heroes of The Silmarillion are fascinating too.



pearlette
pearlette at 2008-12-02 15:16 (UTC) (Link)
Oh, and I love that scene with Holm's Frodo drinking alone, and obviously feeling sad and missing Bilbo. Absolutely brilliant. I think it was that scene which made me love Holm's Frodo when I first listened to the BBC LotR, in the spring of 1987.

How I loved the BBC LotR! And at the time I was the only Tolkien fan I knew. :( Nobody else in my life shared the passion at all. :(

And then, eleven years later, that all changed ...
Mechtild
mechtild at 2008-12-02 15:54 (UTC) (Link)
I think it was that scene more than any other, your glowing description of it, that made me find a copy of the discs to borrow and listen to for the first time. His performance is one that has marked my imagination forever. The expressive, beautiful face of film-Frodo is etched there indelibly, but countless line readings by Ian Holm are there, too, informing my imagination every time I read or think about the book.
pearlette
pearlette at 2008-12-02 16:19 (UTC) (Link)
Oh, really? :) I had forgotten my glowig description of it but then I was forever praising the merits of the BBC LotR on the boards! :)

We had a great comparison thread at Imladris/CoE: compare the differences between PJ's films and the BBC LotR, what you like, what you hate, about both ... :)
Mechtild
mechtild at 2008-12-02 16:53 (UTC) (Link)
There was such a comparison thread at K-D, too. It was fun to participate. I learned a lot.
Mechtild
mechtild at 2008-12-02 15:50 (UTC) (Link)
Yes, well, I was a reader who read Frodo as a "comfortable English bachelor," too. I guess I still do, because the story works better for me if Frodo is a well-adjusted sort of guy, reasonably happy with his life at the beginning, someone who in "A Shadow of the Past" is alive to what Gandalf is telling him, feeling awe and fear and excitement, quick to volunteer, quick to say "off with his head!" regarding Gollum, and quick to feel frightened at what he'd done after he'd done it. That is, he's a "regular" person. Not a sad, melancholy sort at all. If he is a "regular person", all the more do I feel the tragedy of his losses on account of the Ring and all he has experienced. That Frodo's life is blighted by his experience of the War doesn't affect me as much if Frodo was always rather unhappy, getting along covering up melancholy and discontent festering inside him, until Gandalf comes back to open the wound for him and let the angsty juices flow.

BUT, even a "regular" well-adjusted person can have enough of a sad past to make him someone who can be contemplative, more and more as he reflects on the good and the bad that has happened, his personal acquaintance with suffering increasing his capacity for empathy. That's more the sort of thing I was thinking of when appreciating the "melancholy strain" Jan's poems have heightened for me. I enjoy some "angsty Frodo" fanfic, but I don't always think it rings true to the character in the book, even if it rings true to the author's Frodo-based creation.

As for HP, I agree that Harry is a "regular guy", if of a different sort. He's a kid, not a seasoned person, inspired or driven by circumstances to desperate, often heroic acts. But he's different in quality, too. Harry, probably because he *is* still a kid, a kid who has lived a very deprived sort of life, doesn't have the quality Frodo has even before he starts off on the Quest. Frodo is notably civilized, well-bred, and honourable. I see these as qualities Harry doesn't yet have, but will develop as he assumes a happier life, establishing his place in the midst of a loving, caring family and friends. This happens after Rowling's books end, or it is implied by her epilogue. Frodo, even if he endured childhood trauma and loss, seems to have benefited from having grown up in the midst of such a circle.

Edited at 2008-12-02 04:01 pm (UTC)
pearlette
pearlette at 2008-12-02 16:24 (UTC) (Link)
BUT, even a "regular" well-adjusted person can have enough of a sad past to make him someone who can be contemplative, more and more as he reflects on the good and the bad that has happened, his personal acquaintance with suffering increasing his capacity for empathy. That's more the sort of thing I was thinking of when appreciating the "melancholy strain" Jan's poems have heightened for me.

I agree with you. That's how I see Frodo too. Well-adjusted. And his melancholy streak, because of his childhood tragedy, has made him compassionate. He's no drama queen. :)

I enjoy some "angsty Frodo" fanfic, but I don't always think it rings true to the character in the book, even if it rings true to the author's Frodo-based creation.

I couldn't agree more. And I've read some wildly OOC fics with Frodo ... they tended to be the 'guilty pleasure' fics. *sheepish face*

Frodo is notably civilized, well-bred, and honourable. I see these as qualities Harry doesn't yet have, but will develop as he assumes a happier life, establishing his place in the midst of a loving, caring family and friends. This happens after Rowling's books end, or it is implied by her epilogue.

Yes, definitely.
Mechtild
mechtild at 2008-12-02 17:06 (UTC) (Link)
I couldn't agree more. And I've read some wildly OOC fics with Frodo ... they tended to be the 'guilty pleasure' fics. *sheepish face*

Especially since they typically have the hottest sex. :)
pearlette
pearlette at 2008-12-03 11:27 (UTC) (Link)
LMAO, that was my sole reason for reading them!!!!!

*pulls a silly face*
Mechtild
mechtild at 2008-12-03 14:05 (UTC) (Link)
*snickers with you*
(Anonymous) at 2008-12-02 20:37 (UTC) (Link)
The words quoted by Pearl also touched my heart:

If laughter were a Sea,
it were a Sea broken
and ended
by the silence of that shore.

Beautiful! For me Jan captures these beloved characters perfectly. One can believe that Bilbo ~ warmed by 'more than a pint or two of honey-tipped ale,' ~ actually 'felt' this as he studied Frodo amidst the Yuletide merriment at Brandy Hall.

I could not help but see
the quiet of my cousin's eyes,
mirrored in his own,
nor the grace
that bespoke the 'faerie wife'
in that odd-slender form.

Echoes of Drogo and Primula reflected in their living son. Bilbo's thoughts tell us something of the parents too: how Bilbo recognised and valued their separate qualities; how even after the space of years he recalls both with such fondness; how he is moved to compassion for the sake of their child. It's lovely, and very touching.

Wonderful screencaps too. Gandalf's reaction at Frodo offering to take the Ring to Mordor is heart-breaking. It always moves me to see it, and I agree with your interpretation, Mechtild, when you describe it as 'love mixed with grief.' On Sir Ian's website there is an entry concerning this particular shot.

http://www.mckellen.com/epost/lotr/l020219.htm

I hope you will not mind me adding this (rather long) quote here, Mechtild, but it's interesting to read Sir Ian's response to a fan's question:

Q: During the council at Rivendell, when Frodo announces that he will take the ring: I feel that the closeup on Gandalf radiates a very complex emotion: Pity, doubt and an overwhelming fear and sorrow. To me, Gandalf was hoping that the hobbits should be spared. At the same time I suspect that he knew, deep inside, that there could be only one way. Now, almost all of my friends have another interpretation of this scene. They all think that Gandalf looks quite relieved and happy when turning to Frodo. (......) What do you think Gandalf really thought and felt about it?

A: Gandalf has told Elrond that Frodo cannot be expected to do more than bring the ring to Rivendell but when Frodo, without coercion, decides to proceed further, I expect what you see on Gandalf's face is relief and admiration. Hobbits never ceasing to amaze him. (......)

Apologies for the long comment! Thank you Mechtild and Jan.

~ Blossom.


Mechtild
mechtild at 2008-12-02 21:46 (UTC) (Link)
What a brilliant reply, Blossom. Thanks so much. I will have to tell jan-u-wine what lovely responses she's getting.

In the Q & A between McKellen and his admirer you linked from Sir Ian's 2/19/2002 post, what most interests me is how closely I read the scene -- not to McKellen in his answer, but to the person who wrote the question! I mean, I see Gandalf's relief and admiration, but most definitely what the questioner described:

[T]he closeup on Gandalf radiates a very complex emotion: Pity, doubt and an overwhelming fear and sorrow. To me, Gandalf was hoping that the hobbits should be spared. At the same time I suspect that he knew, deep inside, that there could be only one way.

But McKellen seems to agree more with the question writer's friends, who were inclined to see Gandalf turning to Frodo as looking "quite relieved and happy". And so Gandalf was, but so much more, I thought. It just goes to show that what an audience or viewer perceives in a work of art or a performance is often more (and even different from) than what the artist/performer intended. And lucky us, whether artists or appreciators, that that is so. To summarize, here's another bit of quotation from the questioner in your link:

[O]ne of the things that I love the most with film and theater: That we all experience things in our own way - that we all fall under individual spells - but at the same time we all get enchanted.

Edited at 2008-12-02 09:48 pm (UTC)
(Anonymous) at 2008-12-03 19:36 (UTC) (Link)
I see so much more than 'relief and admiration' in Gandalf's expression too, Mechtild. Like you, my interpretation corresponds much more closely with the questioner's view than with Sir Ian's own appraisal of Gandalf's feelings.

It is fascinating how we can all see the same thing on screen, yet 'read' it differently.

~ Blossom.

(Deleted comment)
Mechtild
mechtild at 2008-12-03 04:16 (UTC) (Link)
Oh, I'm so glad you got to read it, Mews. I love it, as well as admire it.
verangel
verangel at 2008-12-04 02:41 (UTC) (Link)
"He will come I have decided" You can feel the silent and firm resolution in this moment. It is a haunting and pensive poem. So beautiful. These scenes from the council have always mesmorized me. I always noticed the pressure Frodo was feeling. He was so linked already to the ring. The sweat beading his upper lip and forehead. His eyes reddening a bit. The inner battle. The determination that builds until he declares he will take the ring. Then that look of resignation, tenderness and sorrow that grace Gandalf's face as he looks on at Frodo.
hugs tons xoxooxo *sighs* v
Mechtild
mechtild at 2008-12-04 02:58 (UTC) (Link)
I love your observations of Frodo in this scene, so detailed, so attentive, the observations of someone who loves.

Thanks for stopping in, Verangel! (And, yes, it is a "haunting and pensive" poem, "pensive" reflecting Bilbo's processing of the situation, and "haunting", perhaps, reflecting the way young Frodo is always on Bilbo's mind. It's as if the moods of the poem come out of the moods of its subject.
telstar109
telstar_gold at 2008-12-04 11:21 (UTC) (Link)
Nobody portrays the Bilbo/Frodo relationship like Jan-u-wine, and this is one of her best. I only know of her poems through your posts - is there a site anywhere where they are all collected together?

Lovely caps once more, of a very memorable and crucial scene. Thanks!
Mechtild
mechtild at 2008-12-04 14:35 (UTC) (Link)
I'm glad you asked, Telstar. There are over sixty posted in entries in my journal. I always put a link at the bottom of any entry that features a jan-u-wine poem. It's also in the links on my sidebar. The link hooks the reader up to a page of links showing all the poem names with an image that shows what sort of illos it is paired with.

http://mechtild.livejournal.com/62922.html

But Jan has *all* of her LotR poetry (and there's loads more) archived at LotR Scrapbook. I keep a link to it on my jan-u-wine links page, too. Here's the link to the Scrapbook:

http://lotrscrapbook.bookloaf.net/poetry/poems/menujanuwine.html

The poems are listed alphabetically by title. Thanks for asking!

telstar109
telstar_gold at 2008-12-06 19:26 (UTC) (Link)
Thanks for the links! I've bookmarked them. I had no idea she'd written so much!
Mechtild
mechtild at 2008-12-06 20:36 (UTC) (Link)
My pleasure!
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