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NF-Lee's Gildor and Frodo

Nope, Frodo wasn't in it, but it sure was good....

Posted on 2005.10.16 at 00:16
Tags: , , ,
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We watched the third film, Prisoner of Azkaban, tonight -- and it really was good! We had just finished watching the first and second Harry Potter films yesterday.

Even though I had heard that the third film was easily the best, I did not expect something this good. The style of the storytelling was vastly improved in this film. It's more clever and witty (in its quirky way), but also more deeply involving emotionally. The musical scoring was noticeably better, too. Even the CGI seemed better. I very much liked the way the creatures were imagined and realised, like the whomping willow and Buckbeak. I had been afraid I would find Buckbeak as disappointing as I found Firenze the centaur.

In scenes that had direct parallels in the earlier films, the difference in quality was very apparent. The Dursley scene in #3 was much sharper and funnier. And, the requisite Quidditch match (which I thought surprisingly yawn-inducing in the first two films), really was gripping in this one.

As for the actors, there were fine performances all over the place. It was additionally exciting to see the child actors morphed into teenagers, especially because I knew that it was true in real life. Harry and Ron? Better than ever. Hermione was better, too. Michael Gambon as Dumbledore was a very notable improvement. I was sorry Maggie Smith didn't have more to do, but I know that she'll be back. The one new character I was surprised not to have liked that well was Emma Thompson's Prof. Trelawny. I just love Thompson's work, normally, but this portrayal left me saying, "Hunh?" I think they would have done better to use someone else for the role.

I want to throw in a special note of appreciation for Robbie Coltrane's Hagrid. I thought the character a trifle silly in the books. Coltrane has managed to make film Hagrid recognizably book-like, yet never actually buffonish. His Hagrid is completely believable; I so much appreciate that he never resorts to hamming it up. (What a shame the LotR filmmakers could not have shown a modicum of the same restraint towards the character of Gimli. Now THERE was buffoonery run amok in so many scenes, to the detriment of the films.

As for the fandom side, in this film I can see how the Remus/Sirius slash has come to be. By which I mean to say that David Thewlis and Gary Oldman did super jobs in their respective roles and were highly sympathetic -- which means that a slash pairing for them in the fandom was inevitable. And Draco? Remember how I was saying I could not imagine Draco slash? Well, I can imagine it now. All that was required was getting rid of his slicked-back hair. An array of hair hanging over his forehead, and, presto, he becomes suitable slash material.

I would go on to praise this film further but it's very late. I am sure I will watch it again, a sure sign that I really enjoyed it. (I don't plan ever to rewatch films one and two.)

I'm just going public to let you who have heard me dismissing the whole HP thing know that I now can see the appeal, having felt it myself. It's not LotR, but, in film three, it's really enjoyable, involving entertainment.

~ Mechtild

Comments:


Mariole
mariole at 2005-10-16 17:07 (UTC) (Link)
I enjoyed the HP films and books. I'm not a fan, but I do enjoy the playfulness of the world Rowling created. Unlike you, I enjoyed the earlier books _more_ because they were less dark. I really am not soaking into that teenage angst--once was enough! But I applaud Rowling's work and take delight in her success.

She does handle the darker themes well. I'm particularly remembering the end of Book IV. I honestly can't remember if I read book 5; I know I haven't read the latest. All in due time. They will be there when I'm ready! But I wanted to read the books before the films. I enjoyed them all, even though 1 reading of the books sufficed, and 1 viewing of each movie, except #2, which I saw again. I enjoy all the actors, although I think Hermione is my favorite. :)
Mechtild
mechtild at 2005-10-16 18:06 (UTC) (Link)
I liked Hermione in the books very much. She's very recognizable to me as the, "love her in spite of her obsessive/compulsive personality" sort of persons I have known. All of Rowling's good guys are flawed, and Hermione is no exception. I know she would have led every social movement I witnessed back in the late twentieth century -- and she'd have done all her own typing and handed out her own leaflets, too. But I felt that the actress wasn't really up to speed until the second film. She needed to grow up a little more to develop the nuances - or else work with a different director.

Mariole, I shouldn't be surprised you liked the lighter books better. *smooch* But, unlike you, I suppose I will always enjoy "teenage angst" stories. (Love that Casey in The Faculty!)

For one thing, I never really lived mine out fully, I suspect (my teenage angst, that is). I think that's one of the reasons I fell so hard for LotR again, mid-life. Vicarious participation in all that angst -- through fiction -- seems to help me look again at all that stuff I ignored or blew off when I was an actual teenager.

But, on a deeper level, I think "teenage angst" themes are ones that human beings never really stop addressing until they are dead; things like, what is the truth about what is going on around me -- and what is my role in it? How can I tell if I am making a right choice in this predicament? What if I can't know what the right choice is? -- how will I live with my actions when I all I can do is choose between "least worst" options?

All of that is intertwined with themes of destiny and identity, too (in my view). Some people seem to be able to take care of all that, once and for all, when they are young. But others of us find that these issues continue to go unresolved, cropping up over and over, especially at intense times in our lives, whether the intensity is negative or positive or both.

I think these sorts of questions run beneath all coming of age stories, but also all stories in which adult characters are forced by circumstances to go beyond what they already know and are comfortable with.
pearlette
pearlette at 2005-10-16 22:30 (UTC) (Link)
The third movie really is the charm, isn't it? :) And Harry getting moodier and slamming doors ... awwww. *pets Harry*

I liked Emma Thompson's Trelawney. :) Her spats with Hermione were very amusing. :p

I like the third book the best too, as you know. :)

That Monster Book of Monsters ... :D I want one, growling under my bed and trying to bite me if I try to read it! :D

I run a mile from Harry Potter slash. :p OK, some of the better Harry/Draco stuff (and when they are of an age, for corn sake) is sexy. And it's the most realistic - and obvious - slash pairing. Harry the Light and his nemesis Draco the Dark. But anything else - ick. :p Of course you have to feel an emotional connection to the characters in order to enjoy slash. There was a time when I was into Frodo/Sam slash and the romantic intensity of that pairing always made sense to me in its own AU way, because the canon relationship is so intense (in a non-sexual way.) I just don't get that with the HP fandom and I wouldn't want to either - I suspect because the fandom is younger, and that makes me uncomfortable.
Mechtild
mechtild at 2005-10-16 23:21 (UTC) (Link)
Nope, Pearl, I didn't love Emma's Trelawny. I suppose I had pictured someone else too intensely (a problem with any book-to-film adaptation). Probably it's because I, myself, am so old. "Old" Sybily Trelawny per Emma was just too young! Not in years, but in era. She could have been at one of my sister's parties in Northern California. I expected someone far more retro -- someone who would use retro things book Trelawny was into: classic devices such as tea leaves, palms and crystal balls. Thompson's Trelawny looked more likely to have used numerology, aroma threrapy, room ambience, Myers-Briggs Types Indicators (love that Myers Briggs!) and various new age frou-frou.

As for HP slash, as I said in Frazzylou's LJ, Rowling herself seems to have set herself up for underage NC-17 stuff. She's very adamant to show that kids are ready and able to take on adult challenges and responsibilities. Why not adult sex? As for Draco, still can't see it. Not because he's too young, but because he's too puling, cowardly and snivelling to be deserving of starring in compelling erotic fic, slash or het.

I can't tell you how disappointed I was at the end of book Six, to find that neither Draco nor Snape experienced a eucatastrophe. I was so hoping that one or both would turn, at the 11th hour, from the Dark Side. I really expected (and hoped) that SOME "bad" character in the HP stories would manage to be lifted out of absolute wickedness, even if only in a deathbed act.

Maybe she is saving it for book Seven? I hope so!
pearlette
pearlette at 2005-10-17 21:18 (UTC) (Link)
I hope so too!

She's really got her work cut out to tie up a lot of things in a cathartic way in Book Seven. *gulp*
Mechtild
mechtild at 2005-10-17 21:46 (UTC) (Link)
She's really got her work cut out to tie up a lot of things in a cathartic way in Book Seven.

Yeah. Maybe it will be even longer than Book 5!!!

P.S. As for Draco fic, I heard in an email from an LJer that the hot Draco fic she's read presents a Draco who simply is not recognizable from the books. Well, that explains one reason there could be a lot of Draco slash out there. I thought maybe some fans had jumped on "Draco crying to Myrtle in the bathroom" to do some hurt/comfort stuff. Maybe they, too, are merely desperate for some character's redemption happening in the books. Draco's, Snape's, Voldemort's; anybody's.
Frankie
frazzylou at 2005-10-20 16:46 (UTC) (Link)
Hey, I know this is a little late, but I haven't been around to post a comment for a while.

I just wanted to say that I'm glad you liked the third film. It is definately much better than the first two (I can't bring myself to watch the second one again, I really disliked it!) but I think Alfonso Cuarón really brought a lot to the film. He's well known for teen/coming of age movies such as Y tu Mama También (which is well worth a look if you don't mind subtitles!). Mike Newell's interpretation is looking to be pretty spectacular too. ^_^
As I've said to many other people, perhaps by the end of the series we'll actually have a decent movie!

As for the relationships in the book, Harry has always seemed to me to be unsuited to anything vaguely romantic. Not that I see him as an asexual character, just that he wouldn't really be able to devote himself to a long term relationship when his attention is mainly focused on Voldemort. As for Draco, I think of him in much the same way, although for different reasons. I always thought that if anything romantic were to happen for him it would be with Ginny, as a sort of Romeo and Juliet type of romance. Servant of the dark Lord and daughter of blood traitors.

As for Remus and Sirius in the movies, they made certain that supporters of that particular 'ship were appeased with the (extremely obvious) married couple comment by Snape. Other than that I loved their portayal, although physically they are not my Sirius and Remus (Remus is too tall and Sirius too petite looking for starters!) their characters are just how I imagine them to be.

Mech, you said you wanted some of the characters to be 'lifted from absolute wickedness'. Personally, I believe that neither Snape nor Draco is evil. Surely Draco's actions, or lack thereof, towards his 'mission' show that he is not cut out to be a death eater, he simply does not believe in what is expected of him. As for Snape, Dumbledore must have had a very good reason for trusting him (which I've gone into in detail in my 'theories' post on my LJ) and I don't think he is evil either, just a very good double agent. Besides, the 11th hour isn't here yet. ^_-

I've got my fingers crossed for book 7 being the best (and longest) one yet!
(Anonymous) at 2005-10-22 19:41 (UTC) (Link)

Lifted from absolute wickedness

I thought it was transparently obvious especially by the end of Book 6 that Snape is "Dumbledore's man." He is not a NICE man, but he is Dumbledore's, and playing a very dangerous game with Voldemort. No writer worth her salt could resist the delicious irony of having her ugliest and most vilified character accomplish the greatest good in the end. The evidence is there; of all the HP fans I know, only one doesn't see it.
Mechtild
mechtild at 2005-10-24 04:10 (UTC) (Link)

Re: Lifted from absolute wickedness

Dear "Anonymous", I am on an internet cafe machine checking my mail from Indianapolis but I couldn't resist.

No writer worth her salt could resist the delicious irony of having her ugliest and most vilified character accomplish the greatest good in the end.

Yes, I thought he was Dumbledore's man, too. Which was why I was grieved that he was made to kill Dumbledore, as Harry had always suspected was Snape's sort of dark, malicious wish. I was not just hoping but expecting her to save Snape to do a sacrificial death in the end, to prove Harry's unworthiest doubts wrong.

The evidence is there; of all the HP fans I know, only one doesn't see it.

Well, "Anonymous," that's pretty direct. That means me, "the one", I guess. *grin*

Do you mean Snape didn't really kill Dumbledore at the end of Book Six (e.g. it was only a hoax of some sort, for purposes To Be Revealed), or that Snape killed Dumbledore as part of Dumbledore's yet-undisclosed "master plan," which would include Snape killing him -- perhaps to guarantee to Voldemort that Snape could be trusted when Snape fell under suspicion for being a double agent? Or perhaps Dumbledore's plan to was have himself killed off to spur Harry on to further greatness on his own? (I had figured that all of Harry's father figures would have to be killed off by the end, so that he could "graduate" as a true hero able to be captain of his own fate, as soon as Sirius Black was killed off. Or perhaps you mean that she is planning for some sort of spiritual return of Dumbledore in a new, higher manifestation a la Gandalf?

On second thought, don't tell me what's going to happen. And I'll resist the tempation to open an HP thread, since they all will be talking about what is going to happen. I can wait. I have never read mystery books just to guess the endings. I like to be along for the whole ride, happy to be ignorant. *grin*
(Anonymous) at 2005-10-24 12:50 (UTC) (Link)

Re: Lifted from absolute wickedness

No, not you. *grin*

--"Snape killed Dumbledore as part of Dumbledore's yet-undisclosed "master plan," which would include Snape killing him -- perhaps to guarantee to Voldemort that Snape could be trusted when Snape fell under suspicion for being a double agent?"--

Exactly. And there is still plenty of time for Snape to sacrifice himself in the end. I suspect it will have to be for Harry's sake, which both of them will hate, but it will come.
Mechtild
mechtild at 2005-10-24 14:09 (UTC) (Link)

Re: Lifted from absolute wickedness

Dear Anonymous,

Exactly. And there is still plenty of time for Snape to sacrifice himself in the end. I suspect it will have to be for Harry's sake, which both of them will hate, but it will come.

Now, now. You weren't supposed to TELL!
Mechtild
mechtild at 2005-10-24 15:12 (UTC) (Link)

Re: Lifted from absolute wickedness

Hi, Frazzy/Frankie/Aquila,

I am back from Indiana. Thanks for your response.

Mech, you said you wanted some of the characters to be 'lifted from absolute wickedness'. Personally, I believe that neither Snape nor Draco is evil. Surely Draco's actions, or lack thereof, towards his 'mission' show that he is not cut out to be a death eater, he simply does not believe in what is expected of him. As for Snape, Dumbledore must have had a very good reason for trusting him (which I've gone into in detail in my 'theories' post on my LJ) and I don't think he is evil either, just a very good double agent. Besides, the 11th hour isn't here yet. ^_-

As you can see from "Anonymous," few HP fans probably believe that Snape has, in actuality, gone over the the "dark side". The very best reason I can think for Snape killing Dumbledore is that he had solemnly vowed to Draco's mother that he will save Draco. So. If Draco had not killed Dumbledore, as he had promised, Voldemort would have killed Draco. Therefore, Snape killed Dumbledore himself, so that Draco wouldn't be found lacking in Voldemort's eyes. Snape was caught between two vows - fidelity to Dumbledore and having to save Draco's life. That's my theory.

As for Draco, I look forward to what Rowling will do for him. So far I have seen him as a stock if neurotic school story bully -- arrogant and nasty, yet weak and cringing as soon as he meets any resistance. I did not see his crying in the lavatory, or his failure to kill Dumbledore, as springing solely from his lack of desire to do an evil thing, but simply as a lack of nerve (if depraved nerve). He was unmanned (un-boyed?), when put to the test. When it came to having to risk himself, he could not do it. So far he has been a blow-hard, happy to let his minions do his actual dirty work. At the end of Six, we seen him given a chance to do his own dirty work. We have seen him bragging cryptically to his friends about the "big mission" he has been given to perform (perhaps to make himself as famous as Harry, whom he so hates and envies) -- if in an infamous way -- but, when it came to it, he simply didn't have the "stones" to do it.

I do not yet see, from the text, anything to show that his fear and misery come from a nobler self suppressed, but from a lack of courage in the face of doing a truly grave at great risk to himself. The only sense I have that he truly, in his heart, did not wish to do it, on account of higher feelings, in the scene in which Dumbledore is trying to talk him out of it, I suspect comes from my own wish to see him reformed. A sense of true inner conflict for Draco also comes to me while reading the scene not from the scene itself, but because it reminds me of Mr. Von Trapp, in the end of The Sound of Music (which I have seen many times), trying to talk young, newly-Nazi-ized Rolf out of betraying the Von Trapp family to their pursuers. Rolf is obviously conflicted, loving Liesel but wanting respect and a position in the Party. Van Trapp tries to appeal to Rolf's prior loyalties and better feelings. It doesn't work, however. Rolf blows the whistle on them. Rolf had no Snape to come and blow the whistle for him, saving him from perfidy.

However, having said that, just because Rowling has not, as a writer, given me adequate "hints" of Draco's goodness so far in print, it does not mean she hasn't got a big rehabilitation for Draco in store. It seems to me, if she is going to stick with her overall genre, it is fitting that Draco be reformed. Therefore, I expect her to reform him, whether she has prepared for it adequately in the text or not.

Of course, personally, I strongly desire that she reform him -- and Snape -- if only so that Harry can be reformed, since his weakness seems to be his obsession with casting about for someone to blame and then seeking vengence upon them.

cont'd - two-part post

Mechtild
mechtild at 2005-10-24 15:14 (UTC) (Link)

Re: Lifted from absolute wickedness

part two

As for film Sirius and Remus, I did like those actors very much in their roles, although I will agree that Gary Oldman lacked the height, looks and presence of book Sirius, who was described as your basic "tall, dark and handsome" sort of youth and man.

As for the relationships in the book, Harry has always seemed to me to be unsuited to anything vaguely romantic. Not that I see him as an asexual character, just that he wouldn't really be able to devote himself to a long term relationship when his attention is mainly focused on Voldemort. As for Draco, I think of him in much the same way, although for different reasons.

I also see Harry as too consumed with his mission to go mucking about with romance with anyone: Ginny, Draco or Dobby the house elf. Even for a teenaged boy, he has seemed all along remarkably uninterested in sex of any sort. His little "awakening" seeing Ginny in the midst of necking was an "ah ha" moment for him, not just about Ginny but about feeling desire generally, I thought.

I always thought that if anything romantic were to happen for him it would be with Ginny, as a sort of Romeo and Juliet type of romance. Servant of the dark Lord and daughter of blood traitors.

I thought it would be Ginny simply because she had had a crush on him for so long. Like in old films like, "It's a Wonderful Life" or "The Robe", difficult heroes often end up with women who had loved them from childhood. It's sort of a literary guarantee of groundedness or permanency; something like that. I simply have not found the way Rowling has worked it out in 5 and 6 convincing, because I am unpersuaded by shy, faithful Ginny's morph into Action Hero girl. Where the heck did that come from?

~ Mechtild
Mechtild
mechtild at 2005-10-24 15:15 (UTC) (Link)
Frazzy, Aquila, Frankie: I replied to your post but inadvertently posted it below the posts with "Anonymous."
Eyborg
eyborg at 2005-11-06 21:22 (UTC) (Link)
I loved all the HP movies, especially the third. :)

The first two movies were very good, although not without flaws. I felt they were much too Disney-like, and with too much "American" feel in them (no offence to Americans, hehe). Perhaps it has to do with the director being American?
The third movie is my favourite so far. Much darker, and much more "Harry Potter like". But the thing I admire most about the third movie is the cinematography - it's just beautiful!!! :)))

I'm actually very happy with all the actors (yes, even Trelawney, although yes, she looks very much like a 60's hippie who has smoked too much grass). The kids are absolutely adorable, and it's so much fun to watch them grow up, and to see them progress in their acting - they get better as they go! :)
My favourite adult actors are probably Maggie Smith (she IS McGonagall!), Alan Rickman (although I'm not really a Snape fan), and Robbie Coltrane (Hagrid). And I found Kenneth Branagh absolutely hilarious as Gilderoy Lockhart. Oh, and one more: David Bradley who plays Mr. Filch, is deliciously ugly. One of my favourite "baddies" in the movies.

Oh, and I admit shamelessly that I have a huge crush on Daniel Radcliffe! (Although he's young enough to be my son!) But isn't it uncanny how much he is starting to look like Elijah Wood lately?

And like I've mentioned before, I'm sooo looking forward to the new movie. I have a feeling it's going to be the best so far (although I hear that Bill Weasley won't be in it - waaahhh!)
Mechtild
mechtild at 2005-11-06 21:55 (UTC) (Link)
Who is Bill Weasley? Oh! The hip brother! Dang, I liked that Weasley a lot. But I loved all the film scenes at the Weasley's. Their home was far better imagined than what I had been thinking of myself. I love the way the dad is playing the role, too.

Yes, I think Daniel Radcliffe is a very winning Harry, much more emotionally accessible and good-looking than book Harry. If I were a teenager, what a crush I would have on film-Harry, since he is heroic (and lovely) in a very open way. But I am already in love with film-Frodo, I simply don't have any devotion left for film-Harry *grin*. Film-Frodo is not only ravishing, but he's simply far more my sort of hero and heart throb. I just love his fineness of character, his nobility and his kind, amiable nature, all put to the test in a gorgeous display of suffering, both spiritual and physical. Harry simply doesn't have all that, even if his voice is soft, his eyes huge and his hair dark and plenteous.

I am so glad you loved Maggie Smith. She is not always mentioned, but I think she is perfect; better, even, than the character in the book (as is film Harry, in my book). I've already gushed over how good Rickman and Coltrane are, to me. And I love David Thewlis -- but I've loved him in his other films, too. I think the Dursleys have been excellent, too. They could have been massively overdone, but they weren't. Oh, and I love John Hurt as the wand shopkeeper (but I love him in everything). Yes, Kenneth Brannagh was wonderful as Lockhart. He's another I thought even better on film than in the book. Moaning Myrtle? A terrible disappointment. I think Draco's father is wonderfully icy and insidious, too.

Yes, you can tell I am looking forward to film 4. Even my daughter, who had refused to even open the books has enjoyed watching the films with me. She, too, though she won't admit it infront of her friends is anxious to see it.
Eyborg
eyborg at 2005-11-18 17:10 (UTC) (Link)
I so agree with you about the Weasleys (both Mr. and Mrs. W. are adorable!) - and I too loved the Weasley house! I could so well imagine living there myself. :)

I can very well understand why you prefer film-Frodo to film-Harry... Frodo is much older (even in hobbit years) and more mature than Harry is yet (Harry is just a kid, really). So Frodo definitely wins if we're talking about mature, dark-haired, heartthrob heroes (although my favourite film hobbit (and book hobbit) is still Merry... purrrrr).
It's just that I love watching Harry (and Ron and Hermione and all the other kids for that matter) basically growing up on the screen! He was such a cuuuuute little kid in the first movie, and in the 7th movie he will be a grown up man! (And who knows, perhaps some of the young actors will already be married by then! LOL!)

I also so agree with you about all the other actors you mentioned - they were brilliant (even John Hurt in his very small role). But I have to disagree with you about Moaning Myrtle though; I looooooved her! :)
Mechtild
mechtild at 2005-11-18 17:26 (UTC) (Link)
I thought film Myrtle was very well-done, technically, but I thought she came off as only funny. In the book, I actually had empathy for Myrtle, even while she made me laugh. I suppose there was enough Myrtle in me as a miserable teenager to identify with her, whingeing and all. Film Myrtle is funny, but she seems irritating, otherwise, not someone I would feel empathy for.

I am very excited about seeing the new film. It's been getting terrific reviews. Our tickets are for Saturday night. I think Daniel Radcliffe is turning out to be a very good actor. I look forward to seeing him play someone other than Harry, if only to see if he is able to. He may have the Elijah problem: a super job in an extremely attractive role, followed by some very good work, but in much less attractive roles. I still am waiting for EW to play another character I can get excited about as a protagonist. So far, he hasn't.
Eyborg
eyborg at 2005-11-18 20:32 (UTC) (Link)
Oh, I see what you mean about Myrtle. I guess I can agree at some point. :) She should perhaps have been more "miserable" in the film, since I've always felt really sorry for book-Myrtle (a part of me wishes that perhaps some day in the future she will finally find peace and not be a ghost forever...)

The new film will open here in Iceland on Nov. 25. I'm not sure yet when exactly I will see it; it will be sometime over that weekend though. Depends on how busy I will be at work (and how tired I will be, lol).

I agree about Daniel Radcliffe; not only is he turning more handsome, he is turning into a very good actor indeed. (And so are all the other kids, especially Rupert Grint as Ron). I simply cannot understand how many people (usually young kids) say that Daniel, Rupert and Emma Watson act badly! Well, I admit that they (esp. Daniel and Emma) were perhaps a wee bit stiff in the first movie (but still good), but they're all coming around. And people forget that those kids are still learning to act! Contrary to what everyone seems to believe, nobody (with perhaps some rare exceptions like Jodie Foster) springs forth a full-fledged actor just like that. Acting is something you need to learn, to be really good. One friend of mine once said that in order to be a good artist/actor/musician, it probably takes 10% talent and 90% work! - I just felt like ranting a bit now because I sometimes feel that people are being overly unfair and harsh especially towards children actors - not to mention that children actors are especially dependant on their directors, much more than adult actors. But so far the HP directors have been doing a good job. :)

I too look very much forward to seeing Daniel try his hand on other roles, when he's done with Potter. I hear that he is now preparing to do a movie in Australia called "December Boys", where he will be speaking with an Australian accent! :D Sounds like something worth taking a look at. :)
And my Inner Eye is telling me that he might make a fine James Bond candidate in 20 years or so! He definitely has the looks for it - it seems like he is going to be the next British hottie, the next generation after Orlando Bloom and Colin Firth! Tee hee.

As for Elijah - did you see Sin City? I haven't yet, but I've heard that Elijah did a pretty good job at playing the "bad guy" there. I might rent the movie, just to see if it's true. ;)
Mechtild
mechtild at 2005-11-18 20:59 (UTC) (Link)
I think the boy who has been playing Ron is really good, too. I felt he sometimes was made to do a lot of mugging, but I blame the director for that. I said it before but I thought he did beautifully in the chess game scene. I think the actor(s) who play the twin Weasleys are great, too. I hope they get more to do in the new film.

As for child actors, as a Frodo fan, of course, I drop in regularly at "The Faculty" the Khazad-dum thread for Elijah Wood as an actor. He seems to have been a good actor since he started, and, a "natural." He is described as doing his work at 100% in terms of energy, but as a child he consistently called it "fun" rather than work. His mother insisted that when it stopped being fun for him, he would not act. Apparently it kept being a thing he really enjoyed doing.

Yes, I saw Sin City, a film I can admire but not love. I watched it once and that was plenty. EW does just what is required in his little role as the one-expression serial killer, Kevin. In fact, he almost got as much critical attention for that five minutes than he did for Frodo! But the role was a really easy one. EW could have done it in his sleep, so it was no big deal as far as I was concerned, in terms of acting, even if he did a fine job.
Eyborg
eyborg at 2005-11-30 15:53 (UTC) (Link)
You're right; Elijah Wood is definitely one of those "rare cases" I spoke about. And so is Haley Joel Osment (although I've never seen him in a movie yet, I've just heard great things about him). Furthermore, Elijah is also one of those lucky child actors that have successfully transformed from a good child actor into a good adult actor (like Jodie Foster did). Not many child actors have succeeded in this - Macauley Culkin didn't (at least we haven't seen that yet).

BTW I just recently saw Goblet of Fire and loooooved it! And I plan to see it again soon. :) I definitely agree about Rupert (yes, I loved the chess scene, one of Ron's finest moments) and the Phelps twins (who played the Weasley twins); they did a great job. I do keep high hopes for all those kids; they seem to be willing to work hard and do the best they can. Can't wait to see them in coming HP movies! :)
Mechtild
mechtild at 2005-11-30 22:38 (UTC) (Link)
Ah, Eyborg, we went back to see Goblet of Fire again, because the theatre we first saw it at was so terrible. Yes, the Weasleys got a LOT of screentime (the twins and Ron, anyway), for which I was very grateful. I really loved their work in this film, which built very well on the previous one.

Haley Joel Osment was great in his "little boy" films like The Sixth Sense. I didn't like him nearly as well in "Secondhand Lions" as a teenager. Hopefully, he is just going through an awkward stage. He was a very good child actor.
Eyborg
eyborg at 2006-01-27 21:19 (UTC) (Link)
I think I mentioned that I had never yet seen HJO in a movie: Well, it seems that it's not entirely accurate. It was actually him who played Forrest Gump as a child in the movie with the same name, and he did a very good job there (it's one of my favourite movies). :)
Mechtild
mechtild at 2006-01-27 23:00 (UTC) (Link)
Yes, I thought he was very good in that, too. He was in several important films as a child.
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