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NF-Lee's Gildor and Frodo

The Dead Marshes, Pt. 1: “So Bright, So Beautiful…” plus poem by jan-u-wine….

Posted on 2007.04.23 at 11:25

Comments:


Whiteling
whiteling at 2007-05-02 20:57 (UTC) (Link)

Re: the Ring's the thing (in which we catch the conscience of the halfling)

I have written poems addressing both Sauron's genesis and his own slavery to that which he created, (and even ones that posit that he is present at Frodo's anniversary illnesses, (but really only in Frodo's mind, which isbad enough))but never one that addresses Frodo's post Quest reflections upon the Dark Lord. Not a place I'd thought to go. But.....

Wah, you give me shivers down my spine again! You explore the most interesting, fascinating and dark realms, jan. Is there any place I can read with what you emerged?


I hope you do email the artist, and would love to hear what he/she says.
Done. I've asked and he replied (he's an ad writer by profession):

There is no profound reason for the choice of ring.
This one just happened to have the right proportions, the right gauge, that is. Its shadow is well accentuated. I've tried the photo with my wedding ring also, but that one is thinner and gold-coloured. It didn't fit as well as the One Ring's silvery tone.


Tsk, tsk. No conscious ambiguity after all... nonetheless, that photo remains enthralling.
Mechtild
mechtild at 2007-05-02 21:09 (UTC) (Link)

Re: the Ring's the thing (in which we catch the conscience of the halfling)

Sorry, I have to butt in. So the choice of the Ring was strictly aesthetic? That is very cool, I think. So many great choices in art (and in a certain film trilogy) that worked wonderfully, touching deep things, seem to have been done with little or no conscious intent. But the results are undeniably strong, as if some muse or God--or the Arts God anyway--had guided the makers.

P.S. I'll send Jan an email that you replied.
Whiteling
whiteling at 2007-05-02 21:24 (UTC) (Link)

Re: the Ring's the thing (in which we catch the conscience of the halfling)

But the results are undeniably strong, as if some muse or God--or the Arts God anyway--had guided the makers.
I agree whole-heartedly. I think Andre Gide was so right in saying: "Art is a collaboration between God and the artist, and the less the artist does the better."

Thanks for informing Jan again!

mechling at 2007-05-02 22:44 (UTC) (Link)

Re: the Ring's the thing (in which we catch the conscience of the halfling)

Andre Gide is a great souce of fine quotes, if this is any example!
(Anonymous) at 2007-05-02 22:28 (UTC) (Link)

Re: the Ring's the thing (in which we catch the conscience of the halfling)

dear Whiteling, thank you so much for going to that trouble. My Ringer nature *hoped* that the whole thing was NOT coincidental, but my practical side feared that it was. (however, if, in fact, the artist *owns* the Ring that was used in his picture, then I have to say that I can't agree with him 100% that it was a mere aesthetic choice. That is, he may think that, but it might NOT be so. That Ring is extremely sneaky, as those who court it have cause to know).

In regards to the poetry:

(this first one is not really poetry, though it has lyrical elements. It is, basically, the story of the Ring, as told through the eyes of each member of the Fellowship (plus one added member, who I believed deserved a memorium as such). I have tried to make it a logical progression, in terms of both time-span as well as who is telling each chapter:

a link:

http://lotrscrapbook.bookloaf.net/stories/01/januwine_fellowship.html

the anniversary illness:

http://lotrscrapbook.bookloaf.net/poetry/poems/jan/januwine_anniversary2.html

(Frodo speaks first, { } indicates the voice of Sauron)

the true slave of/to the Ring:

http://lotrscrapbook.bookloaf.net/poetry/poems/jan/januwine_orphan.html

Someday I shall get 'round to writing some post-Quest reflections of Frodo on Sauron. How could he NOT have had them? Only a person of little intellect and small spirit could have simply bounced back into their old life with never a thought to the being responsible for so much of their pain (and, when he could admit to it, so much that he desired, with a pleasured sort of pain) Frodo was neither of those things. I should think he would pity that angel-who-was-no-more. After all, even though Frodo "failed", his failure was still much less than Sauron's. Frodo's *will* gave out, not his moral compass.

jan

Whiteling
whiteling at 2007-05-03 21:28 (UTC) (Link)

Re: the Ring's the thing (in which we catch the conscience of the halfling)

Thanks so much, dear Jan, for the links to your poetry. Will indulge myself in them on the weekend when I have more time and a clear head.

Someday I shall get 'round to writing some post-Quest reflections of Frodo on Sauron.
That's an exciting prospect. I'm looking very much forward to what Frodo's thoughts will be. He looked so deep into the mind of Sauron the Ex-Angel, and surely there was a kind of "understanding" and in the end possibly pity, yes.
(Anonymous) at 2007-05-04 07:04 (UTC) (Link)

Re: the Ring's the thing (in which we catch the conscience of the halfling)

Dear Whiteling, I will look forward to your comments, should you have any and/orfeel like sharing them.

I don't anticipate writing these pieces soon (too very little time (I'm at work, still, and it has just turned midnight, so, as you see.....)), but sometime I will get 'round to them. The question will be, then: will I be writing them for myself, or will LOTR have been resurrected again (or better still, *never* have become quiescent, and in need of resurrection).

(lest you think I've been slaving here for fifteen hours +, Mech, I went to a movie in between times and am now back here for a moment)

j
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