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NF-Lee's Gildor and Frodo

Nan Gagnon's "Reunion", plus Jan-u-wine's "Across So Wide a Sea"....

Posted on 2006.12.02 at 06:10

Comments:


Gentle Hobbit
gentlehobbit at 2006-12-03 00:02 (UTC) (Link)
Thank you very much for this lovely post, Mechtild. I too have seen those kinds of early Rennaissance (and Medieval, I believe, as well) paintings that tell a story with the same people repeating within the work. The Bayeux Tapestry also comes to mind.

The painting is utterly beautiful. I love how she has used that storytelling technique.

I also enjoyed the poem. I think that among the more emotional parts, this was the bit that stood out for me the most:

Smoke rings
of insignificant
magnificence
rise
like unspoken
words
into leaven'd dark.


That, for me, was the most quietly emotional bit. It is so visual that I feel as if I were there, with the history and memories of Bag End and all who lived or visited there: Bilbo, Gandalf, the dwarves, Frodo, and Sam. Unspoken words indeed! Lovely!
Mechtild
mechtild at 2006-12-03 01:26 (UTC) (Link)
I feel as if I were there, with the history and memories of Bag End and all who lived or visited there: Bilbo, Gandalf, the dwarves, Frodo, and Sam. Unspoken words indeed! Lovely!


Oh, now you're making me cry over that part, too! Thank you for making that even more vivid for me. You are very right about the resonance of that line.

Medieval art did this, too? I suppose it would have, since they also had so many paintings in which actual captions were included, lettered ribbons coming out of the mouths of subjects the way text balloons would today, in comic books or graphic novels.

Thanks so much again for commenting, Gentlehobbit. :)
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