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NF-Lee's Gildor and Frodo

Gorgoroth Pt. IV ~ "Naked in the dark," plus jan-u-wine's 'All That I Deem Precious'....

Posted on 2006.08.24 at 15:28

Comments:


pearlette
pearlette at 2006-08-24 23:27 (UTC) (Link)
Frodo's 'wheel of fire' speech is one of the most powerful passages in the book. It moved me tremendously the first time I read it. (The book has never made me cry, you know. Even after all these years, when it's so familiar to me, and I love it so much.)

I just love Ian Holm's delivery of the 'wheel of fire' speech. Some people, on hearing the BBC radio version after seeing the films, were disappointed with Holm's acting in this scene. I can't agree. I thought it was perfect, and I still do. I love Holm's Frodo for his steeliness and maturity ... here he sounds exhausted, drained of life and hope, knowing that the full weight of his grim destiny is about to descend on him, knowing there is no escape and no way out, he must see it through to the bitter end.

I am naked in the dark, Sam, and there is nothing between me and the wheel of fire.

Meep meep meep. MEEEEP.

I'm not sold on Frolijah's panting delivery of the speech (I have no objection to his panting in any other context ... *snicker*) Ahem. *cough*

But he does look so very lovely, cradled in Sean Astin's arms.

(Lucky, lucky, lucky Sean.)

Mechtild
mechtild at 2006-08-25 00:54 (UTC) (Link)
Hmmmm. I think I will stick with the story I told Maeglian (above). Except for his poor diction, considering where Fran and Philippa moved the "wheel of fire speech" - all the way to the slopes of Mt. Doom when Frodo could only make croaking sounds, and Sam could not swallow, he really would be panting and a little frantic. In the book, the wheel of fire speech has a much more melancholy, resigned, or regretful mood. As you say so well, Pearl:

"....exhausted, drained of life and hope, knowing that the full weight of his grim destiny is about to descend on him, knowing there is no escape and no way out, he must see it through to the bitter end."

In the book scene, Frodo is still able to walk and talk at that point. But on Mt. Doom, until Gollum's assault gives him his last spurt, he's really far more incapacitated, more the way he appears in the film.

I love Ian Holm in the whole of the Frodo role, and the Mordor scenes are each and every one a masterpiece between the two of them, Frodo and Sam. I remember being one of those listeners who found his Wheel of Fire speech a let-down, emotionally, having come from the film scene (although I greatly appreciated that I could understand every word), but I really did not take into account, then, what different places in the segment that speech came, between book and film.
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