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NF-Lee's Gildor and Frodo

Inspiration to Diet ~ Pics from the King Kong DVD Extras....

Posted on 2006.04.24 at 17:32

Comments:


Mona
lame_pegasus at 2006-04-25 12:04 (UTC) (Link)
Oh - and I simply loved the movie. I sat there when I watched it for the first time, secretly grinning, and imagining a small, excited boy with short trousers, sitting in the movies somewhere in New Zealand, and enjoying every single minute of the old movie with Fay Wray. That helped a lot to enjoy it with exactly the same attitude, dinosaurs and bugs and all. And the scenes between King Kong and Anne were deeply moving.
Mechtild
mechtild at 2006-04-25 13:08 (UTC) (Link)
Ah, I'm in love with your response. I must show your post to my daughter. She takes it as a personal cut every time she reads a criticism on the messageboards, and especially if the critical fan has been a Lord of the Rings fan.

I loved it, too, but I watched with an indulgent eye, already fond of the team in a personal way for having given me the trilogy. I do think it hurt the quality of the film to have let the scenes mentioned go as long as they did. Some other things that marred the film were mentioned by critics (what happened to the Jimmy/Hayes subplot?, for instance - a big build-up in the first hour to not much of anything in the second), but they didn't fret at me much. I could dismiss them in the face of the the overall excellence of the film, just as I did for LotR.

When I read people saying how Jackson/Boyens/Walsh ruined Tolkien for them because of the various errors and bad choices (and there were quite a few), I felt like saying, "Would you say the basilica of St. Peter's sucked as a piece of architecture, because there were some ill-chosen bits of mosaic and trim, or even an entire unsuited side chapel? Surely not!"

I loved the Anne/King Kong portion of the film. Along with the way he developed the theme of art and mystery, and how humans sell it out and debase it even as they seek and love it, it was my favourite aspect.

P.S. Belegcuthalion, 35 pounds?!?!?!?!? That's utterly fantastic! You and Scarlet both will now go on my mental bulletin board as "inspirations."
Mona
lame_pegasus at 2006-04-25 14:01 (UTC) (Link)
Thank you, dear. Those 35 pounds are already a miracle for me. but I have 143 pounds still to go (for I'm a really BIG Mama...). Thank God the WW-recipes are delicious, and easy to cook... and the kids like them, too, which makes things a lot easier.
Mechtild
mechtild at 2006-04-25 14:28 (UTC) (Link)
I don't care how many pounds you have to go, Belegcuthalion. I know what it is not to be able to control my impulse to over-eat for even a day, much less weeks and months and even years. That you could do what you have already done is a testament to how invested, how 'on the way' you are. I am very, very happy for you.

To be in control of one's appetites is an issue fraught with emotion and politics in our time. It's considered controlling, even unfashionable (acquiescing to the media and peer pressure) to applaud self-control when it comes to indulging in pleasures, as if one were without backbone to heed warnings of moderation.

But anyone who knows what it is to drag around a lot of extra weight, huff and puff needlessly going up stairs or unable to get out of a chair with ease and grace knows that these protests about being coerced or made to feel bad by societal expectations sound hollow.

It's one thing to make young people feel bad because they aren't pencil thin and don't look like Barbies and Kens. This should be resisted. It is another thing not to applaud people trying to deal with health-diminishing poundage, witholding encouragement from them (or being unwilling to help them see it if they don't in the first place), just because people don't want to look like they are being controlling, or buying into cultural ideals of beauty. What constitutes "attractive" is a matter of personal taste and societal conditioning. What constitutes "healthy" is less variable.

Gee, that turned into sort of a rant.

Anyway, GO, MONA!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Mona
lame_pegasus at 2006-04-25 15:25 (UTC) (Link)
(((((Mechtild))))

You know, I don't do this for beauty (though I must admit that it is interesting to discover that I actually have cheekbones!), but mainly for my health.

But anyone who knows what it is to drag around a lot of extra weight, huff and puff needlessly going up stairs or unable to get out of a chair with ease and grace knows that these protests about being coerced or made to feel bad by societal expectations sound hollow.

Only too true. I would still not be able to do a marathon (or even a 10-miles-uptempo-march), but I can walk up a steep street without having the feeling that I might collapse any second. I breathe more freely, and I am twice as agile than I was before. I see a silver streak at the horizon, and that is wonderful.
Mechtild
mechtild at 2006-04-25 22:25 (UTC) (Link)
I can walk up a steep street without having the feeling that I might collapse any second. I breathe more freely, and I am twice as agile than I was before.

This sounds great. I have only started walking to work three times a week because our daughter needs the car when she comes home from school in order to go to her job. I's only about a mile, but all uphill, non-stop, some of it steep. I was a WRECK the first few times, nearly hoarse and coughing by the time I got to work. Now, ten walks later, it's still difficult but not as wrenching. It just shows how unexercised I've become, but also how quickly one sees a little bit of improvement. You sound really happy and full of zest.
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