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NF-Lee's Gildor and Frodo

Tolkien's Landscapes 3: 'Moonlight on a Wood' ~ picture by Tolkien, poem by jan-u-wine.

Posted on 2013.07.04 at 18:11

Comments:


pearlette
pearlette at 2013-07-05 09:11 (UTC) (Link)
This is "...jazz from a man who was always a classicist....."

Definitely. :) Fascinating.

Great period in art, that, the early 1900s to 1930s. I'm fascinated by Surrealism in particular. Weird and often disturbing, but such originality and creativity. I went to a wonderful exhibition on Surrealism at the Victoria & Albert museum about 6 years ago. It all coincided with the new 'religion' of psychology and Jungian-ism, etc etc.

All vastly different from Tolkien's own creative sources and stream. But I like this one and only experiment with Cubism he did!

I didn't realise he had family hols at Lyme Regis (I should do, since I've read his biography, although many years ago now). My mother loves Lyme Regis - it's where she spent her summer holidays as a child, during WW2. It sounds like a peaceful holiday haven, even though the Germans were bombing Portland just up the coast! It's a lovely place - you've got the medieval Cobb, and the Jurassic Coast, and the literary associations with Jane Austen and 'The French Lieutenant's Woman'. ;)

Of course JRRT and Edith retired to Bournemouth in their old age.

Now here is a funny thought - my family were in Lyme Regis during the summer of 1973, when I was 11. It was a very hot summer. Tolkien died that year, in September. My brother was reading LotR during our holiday. I began reading it, but got scared by the Barrow Wight (and it was very long, even for an 11 year old bookworm). I was determined to return to it one day. I did, 10 years later!
Mechtild
mechtild at 2013-07-05 18:29 (UTC) (Link)
Howdy, Pearl!

You have been to Lyme Regis? How lucky of you! I always associate Lyme Regis with the pertinent chapters in Jane Austen's 'Persuasion', my favourite of all her novels (if I had to choose).

Great period in art, that, the early 1900s to 1930s. (...) It all coincided with the new 'religion' of psychology and Jungian-ism, etc etc. All vastly different from Tolkien's own creative sources and stream.

Yes, vastly different. Yet in spite of the disparity Tolkien managed to make fine use of the Cubist style to make this arresting picture. I really do love it, more a picture of a perception of moonlit woods rather than of the woods themselves.
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