Mechtild (mechtild) wrote,
Mechtild
mechtild

Galadriel’s Glade 3 ~ ‘I know what it is you saw’, plus jan-u-wine's 'Lórien Suite 3'.

~*~

The following quote from "The Mirror of Galadriel" (fuller excerpt below), is a passage etched indelibly on my mind's eye:

She lifted up her white arms, and spread out her hands towards the East in a gesture of rejection and denial. Eärendil, the Evening Star, most beloved of the Elves, shone clear above. So bright was it that the figure of the Elven-lady cast a dim shadow on the ground. Its rays glanced upon a ring about her finger; it glittered like polished gold overlaid with silver light, and a white stone in it twinkled as if the Elven-star had come down to rest upon her hand. Frodo gazed at the ring with awe; for suddenly it seemed to him that he understood.

None of my favourite Tolkien illustrators have been able to capture this moment for me in visual art. I wondered what the filmmakers would do with it, considering the iconic nature of the vision invoked. As it turned out, they didn't do anything with it. It wasn't there. Nenya makes it into the EE version of the scene (thanks, commenters, for pointing it out), but in the theatrical release Nenya is neither referred to or shown.

I loved the book moment because of its visual imagery, but also because it explained more fully why the light in Galadriel's parting gift to Frodo—the star-glass—was so special and so powerful. Ah, well. That's the way of even the best film adaptations: some things you love will be lost, others will be changed beyond recognition. Still, I think the scene is awfully good up to this point. I certainly do not fault the actors.

Jan-u-wine has written a third part to her Lórien Suite. It appears below the screencaps. This poem, inspired by the film's images, shows Frodo as he breaks away from the vision in the Mirror. Jan brings the reader right into the Ring-bearer's thoughts.



~*~



Book scene: The Mirror of Galadriel.


‘I know what it was that you last saw,’ she said; ‘for that is also in my mind. Do not be afraid! But do not think that only by singing amid the trees, nor even by the slender arrows of elven-bows, is this land of Lothlórien maintained and defended against its Enemy. I say to you, Frodo, that even as I speak to you, I perceive the Dark Lord and know his mind, or all of his mind that concerns the Elves. And he gropes ever to see me and my thought. But still the door is closed!’

She lifted up her white arms, and spread out her hands towards the East in a gesture of rejection and denial. Eärendil, the Evening Star, most beloved of the Elves, shone clear above. So bright was it that the figure of the Elven-lady cast a dim shadow on the ground. Its rays glanced upon a ring about her finger; it glittered like polished gold overlaid with silver light, and a white stone in it twinkled as if the Elven-star had come down to rest upon her hand. Frodo gazed at the ring with awe; for suddenly it seemed to him that he understood.

‘Yes,’ she said, divining his thought, ‘it is not permitted to speak of it, and Elrond could not do so. But it cannot be hidden from the Ring-bearer, and one who has seen the Eye. Verily it is in the land of Lórien upon the finger of Galadriel that one of the Three remains. This is Nenya, the Ring of Adamant, and I am its keeper.

‘He suspects, but he does no know—not yet. Do you not see now wherefore your coming is to us as the footstep of Doom? For if you fail, then we are laid bare to the Enemy. Yet if you succeed, then our power is diminished, and Lothlórien will fade, and the tides of Time will sweep it away. We must depart into the West, or dwindle to a rustic folk of dell and cave, slowly to forget and to be forgotten.’

Frodo bent his head. ‘And what do you wish?’ he said at last.

‘That what should be shall be,’ she answered. ‘The love of the Elves for their land and their works is deeper than the deeps of the Sea, and their regret is undying and cannot ever wholly be assuaged. Yet they will cast all away rather than submit to Sauron: for they know him now. For the fate of Lothlórien you are not answerable, but only for the doing of your own task. Yet I could wish, were it of any avail, that the One Rig had never been wrought, or had remained for ever lost.’


~*~



Film scene:


[Galadriel watches as the Ring, hanging from Frodo’s neck, pulls him closer to the water. Steam curls up from the basin and Sauron speaks to Frodo in Black Speech. Terrified, he grabs the Ring and jerks back, throwing himself off the step and landing on his back on the floor of the glade.]

Galadriel: I know what it is you saw, for it is also in my mind.

[Telepathically, Galadriel speaks to Frodo, who listens intently.]

Galadriel: It is what will come to pass if you should fail. The Fellowship is breaking. It has already begun.














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3




He has found me.


At last,

he
has,

the evil-tatter'd
ribbon

of dark mouthings
touching

my mind
with foul purpose.

I do not
understand

these words.

No matter:
the black

meaning of them
closes my throat,

as if dead fingers
held me fast.

I cannot look away,
cannot

stop
the words

which pull me to him.

In a moment,
he shall have me,

entire.

From outside myself,
there is light,

Like the wings of some
great Sea-bird of the West,

it is,
assailing with ancient purpose
our fearsome enemy.


* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Ghostly vapor

rises
yet upon the sudden-still air.

In the end,
I did

not
touch the water.

Nor he,
me.

The grace of light
still falls

about the lady.

Sweetly it flows
from her outstretched hand,

crowns with silver'd gold
the cloak of her hair.

Within my mind,

she, too,
speaks,

her words
as fearful

as those which
I have but late

escaped.

With dark truth
she speaks.

Oh, my Lady.

How shall I go on?











Previous entry:


~ Galadriel’s Glade 2: ‘Frodo looks into the mirror, plus jan-u-wine's 'Lórien Suite 2'.

Other Links:

~ Entries with jan-u-wine's poems.


~ Main table for all entries


~ Mechtild
Tags: fellowship of the ring, frodo screencaps, jan-u-wine, screencaps
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