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NF-Lee's Gildor and Frodo

‘I Can See the Shire’ in Widescreen, plus jan-u-wine’s “March 25”.

Posted on 2007.10.21 at 21:27
Tags: , ,
~*~


If you follow this project, you will know that I have already screencapped this scene, extensively, in fullscreen. But I so loved this poem, which I only just saw—Jan’s look at Frodo’s quiet euphoria after the destruction of the Ring—that I decided to re-do the scene using the widescreen edition.

Considering just the look of the caps, I still think the fullscreen version is best for appreciating the face of Frodo (links provided at bottom of post). But the widescreen version does show the characters to better advantage when they are both in the same frame.

This post (for the widescreen version) also has far fewer caps than I presented before. This is both a plus and minus. It’s good because it’s nice to be able to look at the whole scene in one post. Its minus is that it doesn’t show the emotional transitions in the scene in as much detail. The fullscreen caps, so numerous they were posted in five entries, show this much better.

As most of you would agree, this is one of the best scenes in the trilogy. I won’t talk about it further here, since I’ve already spoken to the scene in last year’s series, in short reflections and answering reader comments. This year, I just wanted to be able to savour jan-u-wine’s poem, March 25, and to scroll through the whole scene, complete with coverage for Sam, in one viewing.



~*~



Film scene:

Frodo: I can see the Shire: the Brandywine River, Bag End, Gandalf’s fireworks, the lights, the Party tree….

Sam: Rosie Cotton, dancing. She had ribbons in her hair. If ever I was to marry someone, it would have been her. It would have been her.

Frodo: I’m glad to be with you, Samwise Gamgee, here, at the end of all thing.


~*~
















































































































































~*~







Book scene,~* from Mount Doom:



Then Gandalf, leaving all such matters of battle and command to Aragorn and the other lords, stood upon the hill-top and called; and down to him came the great eagle, Gwaihir the Windlord, and stood before him.

‘Twice you have borne me, Gwaihir my friend,’ said Gandalf. ‘Thrice shall pay for all, if you are willing. You will not find me a burden much greater than when you bore me from Zirak-zigil, where my old life burned away.’

‘I would bear you, ‘answered Gwaihir, ‘whither you will, even were you made of stone.’

‘Then come, and let your brother go with us, and some other of your folk who is most swift! For we have need of speed greater than any wind, outmatching the wings of the Nazgûl.’

‘The North Wind blows, but we shall outfly it,’ said Gwaihir. And he lifted up Gandalf and sped away south, and with him went Landroval, and Meneldor young and swift. And they passed over Udûn and Gorgoroth and saw all the land in ruin and tumult beneath them, and before them Mount Doom blazing, pouring out all its fire.

[Intervening passage in which Sam coaxes Frodo away from Mt. Doom and onto the little island of ash.]

And so it was that Gwaihir saw them with his keen far-seeing eyes, as down the wild wind he came, and daring the great peril of the skies he circled in the air: two small dark figures, forlorn, hand in hand upon a little hill, while the world shook under them, and gasped, and rivers of fire drew near. And even as he espied them and came swooping down, he saw them fall, worn out, or choked with fumes and heat, or stricken down by despair at last, hiding their eyes from death.

Side by side they lay; and down swept Gwaihir, and down came Landroval and Meneldor the swift; and in a dream, not knowing what fate had befallen them, the wanderers were lifted up and borne far away out of the darkness and the fire.






~*~







March 25

~ by jan-u-wine


astray
bearing
a great
burden
without guidance:

Frodo Baggins, Ringbearer*
______________________


No more.

The heel of the mountain
cradles me:

The
World.

My world.

It will never
be the same.

I rest upon
this stone-tossed
Road
as if it
were a bed of Light.

I understand
what it is
to smile again,
to breathe.

Even fire-consumed air
seems fresh,

sharply smooth
with Spring.

In my mind,
I lie,

concealed

within the
sweet green
hills of Home.

Soft light

plays

through budding
leaves-

laughter,

wild sweet
laughter
of children,

hidden in fields

full,
ripe
and rich
with life

pours

through me like drowsy
sunlight

upon a warm-flagged floor.

Beyond the hard,
delicate
lace
of snow-drowned
Caradhras,

beyond the sleeping
treasure of Mirrormere,

beyond Lorien's long
autumn,

and the amber-hued

suspended
beauty

of the Last Homely House,
the depthless
grey eye
of the Sea
beckons me.

Elves....
men....
dwarves....

the great
wheel
of the world

thrums
with song.

A new Song,

shaded,
tinged
by sorrow,
by sadness,

by bittersweet,
redemptive loss.

Joy
washes through me,
harsh and beautiful,
all at once.

The world
comes back

in a rush of sound
and sight.

Your hand
presses mine.

Lines of care

spider-web

the corners of your eyes.

Your voice,
strange,

desperately beautiful,

like the first voice
I ever heard,
welcomes me........

What

are you saying?


'Home'


The woods,
the fields,
the little rivers.....

Home:

The Hill,
the bright green
of the door,

the garden
heavy with summer,

the kind eyes
of familiar stars,

the cool comforting dust of the road.

Home........

How soon
do you
suppose
we can start,
Sam?

___________________________________

he may
become
like a glass
filled
with clear light
for eyes
to see that can:

Frodo Baggins, gentle-hobbit of the Shire*





* J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring





~*~









Widescreen vs. Fullscreen:


To remind readers of the difference between fullscreen and widescreen editions, below are caps of the same frame made from the different versions. If you haven't seen the fullscreen set, and are a fan of this scene, I'm providing links the series below.



Widescreen:





Fullscreen:





Technical notes:

I have, as usual, trimmed a bit off the sides of the widescreen version, making the caps an even 800 pixels wide.

Also, the widescreen screencaps look redder because they are redder. I actually altered the colour for the fullscreen series, something I almost never do. I thought taking out the red wash made it easier to see the details of Frodo's face.




Fullcreen series for this scene, from March 2006:


~ The End of All Things Pt. I: "It's Done..."


~ The End of All Things Pt. II: "I can see the Shire..."


~ The End of All Things Pt. III: "Rosie Cotton, dancing..."


~ The End of All Things Pt. IV: "If ever I was to marry someone..."


~ The End of All Things Pt. V: "I'm glad to be with you..."





Recent entries:


~ Sammath Naur Escape Pt 1: Leap over the lava, plus jan-u-wine’s “They Are Here".


~ Sammath Naur Escape Pt 2: ‘It’s done.’


~ ‘I can see the Shire’ in widescreen, plus jan-u-wine's “March 25”.




Other Tables of Links:


~ Entries with jan-u-wine's poems.

~ Frodo & Elijah Wood screencap entries



~ Mechtild

Comments:


verangel
verangel at 2007-10-22 04:00 (UTC) (Link)
This is an important part to me. I missed what you said last year..so I will go back and look. But, the screen caps alone, the tears, the tear off Frodo's nose, the look of such emotion that I can't even put words to it right now. So much in his exhaustion, wiery of life, relieved of burdon...but one thing that strikes me..that so many would not like...is so intensified to me in this moment. Sam/Sean is wonderful in his heartfelt feeling of life ending..But it is Frodo..and every nuance of movement and sadness and ending...but even moreso is that Elijah is so many years younger than Sean, but here..he looks older and wiser and its more than the makeup..it is the intensity of the moment. Its his face. But then, they melt into each other and Sam/Sean's hand clenches Frodo's arm, shirt, in one last desperate hold.
xoxo (teary) v
Mechtild
mechtild at 2007-10-22 14:02 (UTC) (Link)
He looks older and wiser and its more than the makeup..it is the intensity of the moment. Its his face.

I think that shows the great acting done for this scene. For Frodo *is* older than Sam in this scene, in terms of his development as a character. Sam, having had to keep them both together for so long, in this scene sort of falls to pieces once the burden is lifted. Everything that he's going to lose, in losing his life, comes home to him now--essentially his future as a hobbit of the Shire. But it took his mind being cleared of constant worry for their survival to be able to feel it.

Frodo, on the other hand, has given all that up (his future as a hobbit of the Shire) what seems like ages ago. On the cone of ash he is merely happy that his identity has been restored, that he still *is* a hobbit of Shire, not how long he will be one. In a way, Frodo's already been through what Sam is suffering now, and can act as Sam's guide and support in the grief Sam is feeling. He really is Sam's support in this scene, reversing what we've been seeing in the last two films.

In a way, in the film version of their story, especially, it's as important for Sam to be carried off and saved as it is for Frodo. If Frodo has unfinished business (spiritually, emotionally) that can't be dealt with, really, except in the Undying Lands, Sam has his own "unfinished business" to work through, but by living his life in the Shire. The lines given to Frodo in ending voice-over were, "You have so much to enjoy and to be, and to do." I think viewers were meant to think that these two great characters, so beloved, both had their "issues" left over from the ordeal they shared, but would need to deal with them in their own spheres before their lives were ready for the final fullness. Which is why I just love Frodo's parting smile so much.
Prim
primula_baggins at 2007-10-22 18:57 (UTC) (Link)
"He really is Sam's support in this scene, reversing what we've been seeing in the last two films."

This is so true. I put together a little video last Spring, and it was to the song "Glory of Love". It is a Frodo/Sam video, and I used screen caps of them from throughout the movie.

I noticed too when the words, "I am the man who will fight for your honor, I'll be the hero that you're dreaming of" come up, at first, it refers to Sam fighting for Frodo's honor. But at this scene, the roles reverse, I think, and it is now Frodo, at last, being the hero for Sam.

Mechtild
mechtild at 2007-10-23 02:59 (UTC) (Link)
I love the way either of them step into the role of mainstay and support when the other is unable to do it. Movie Sam has been supporting Frodo for so long, Frodo so often in a state of acute distress, falling apart, falling down, etc., it's all the more affecting when it is he who falls apart, thus all the more stirring to see, as if proof that the Ring has really departed, Frodo freed to be Sam's support.

As Pearl pointed out below, in the book scene, it's Sam whose talk keeps their spirits up as they face death in the book. But in the book, Frodo has been the strong silent type all along, holding steadfastly to their mission through sheer wit and will until the very last minute standing on the brink of the Crack of Doom.

Not that Sam is new to the role of raconteur in their friendship in the book. "I want to hear more of Sam's talk, Dad! He makes me laugh!" Frodo makes the hypothetical Shire lad say back in the pass of Cirith Ungol. But although he made a Shire lad say it, Frodo really could have been speaking for himself. Sam makes him laugh; it is he who has come to love Sam's talk. I really hadn't got it before, sad to say, reading the book for years, that Frodo really did enjoy Sam's company as such. I loved Sam, but I didn't really get it that he was actually a pleasure to be with. It was Bill Nighy's reading of the role (in the BBC radio play) interacting with Ian Holm's Frodo, in their lighter scenes, that showed me how much Frodo actually *enjoyed* Sam's company, and valued him as a person, just for who he was, and not because Sam was so heroic, and because Frodo was beholden to him.

Book Frodo may have been very enduring, but his spirits were low a great deal of the time after they left Lothlorien, his hopes small then non-existent. Sam's "talk" was the antedote for his own propensity for interior gloom, which got darker as the Quest went on. , his own hope nearly unquenchable, is his light in the darkness as much as the phial of Galadriel. Gee, I sure did get off the subject. Thanks for being patient, Primula. I must have had all that on my mind. :)
verangel
verangel at 2007-10-23 04:16 (UTC) (Link)
Book Frodo may have been very enduring, but his spirits were low a great deal of the time after they left Lothlorien, his hopes small then non-existent. Sam's "talk" was the antedote for his own propensity for interior gloom, which got darker as the Quest went on. "

You know, you just made the movie and book connect even now because this is how it was on film.

I love Sam. I just didn't love certain moments that made him larger than life (on film). But...in the purest fashion...their moments melt me and I am so thankful they are together, for each other...to death. It is the most perfect friendship, love undying, loyalty everlasting.

I didn't go into the screencaps in detail. I have the FS and WS versions...and zoom capactiy on my DVD. But there is something you miss from each. Wide chops heads, Full cuts sides. But in a way, I love the full better because the face is just...there...and anytime I zoomed it was to get Frodo's face. because the dialogue for the film was in his face at times.
xoxoxo v
Mechtild
mechtild at 2007-10-23 12:51 (UTC) (Link)
I didn't go into the screencaps in detail. I have the FS and WS versions...and zoom capactiy on my DVD. (...) But in a way, I love the full better because the face is just...there...and anytime I zoomed it was to get Frodo's face. because the dialogue for the film was in his face at times.

(Bold-face emphases mine.)

That is so eloquently put, Verangel. It *is* like "seeing" the lines, but spelled out in his face. Thanks!

~ M
verangel
verangel at 2007-10-24 02:08 (UTC) (Link)
These moments take me over..even watching the screencaps. It takes me to your comments you laid out so honestly. My family could hardly understand what was going on with me. I hid it for a months...snuck to the theater...found onering..found LJ..It took a long while before I said basically..F'it. I am changing, I have grown and my inner me loves this..loved this movie, loved falling in love with it. But...I didn't do that until ROTK..and I was totally transfixed and blown away by the beauty of Frodo in this. I loved the whole movie..Every part makes me look, wait, feel in awe. But what I remember most is truly Frodo's intensity. Sam's loyalty. But Elijah's acting and face..sealed it because he was the anchor. Without his pain and believability it would never have worked.

hugs you...v
Mechtild
mechtild at 2007-10-24 02:36 (UTC) (Link)
Without his pain and believability it would never have worked.


Absolutely. :)
Estë   (or ST for short)
este_tangletoes at 2007-10-22 09:12 (UTC) (Link)
Frodo Baggins, gentle-hobbit of the Shire

*weeps*

--Estë
Mechtild
mechtild at 2007-10-22 13:47 (UTC) (Link)
It does sound rather like something that would appear on Frodo's tomb stone, if he had had one, doesn't it? Something modest and unassuming, but true--like him. *weeps with you*
Prim
primula_baggins at 2007-10-22 18:49 (UTC) (Link)
"And even as he espied them and came swooping down, he saw them fall, worn out, or choked with fumes and heat, or stricken down by despair at last, hiding their eyes from death."

*sigh*

Frodo/Sam.

We need another movie! : D
Mechtild
mechtild at 2007-10-23 03:24 (UTC) (Link)
I used to think there could never be another movie, the trilogy being so utterly awesome. But no one can resist doing a classic forever. For better or for worse, I'll bet there's another one of these decades. There are a lot of ways this book could be filmed, so it could even be good if it stayed true to its own vision of the story. But if they just tried to repeat what Jackson and Co. did, I doubt it would be much of a success. That could not be repeated.
pearlette
pearlette at 2007-10-22 19:11 (UTC) (Link)
Without a doubt, one of the very best scenes in RotK and maybe the whole Trilogy. Pitch-perfect and purely Tolkienesque, no annoying PJ-isms here. (By that I mean PJ trying to amp something up by injecting an invention of his own, e.g. Frodo sending Sam away.)

In the book, I think it is Sam who tries to comfort Frodo the most as they wait to die on the slopes of Mount Doom. Frodo is just numb, relieved the Ring is gone and too exhausted to think much - it is Sam who tries to keep the fear away until the very end, bless him. But in the film these roles are reversed slightly - it is Sam, crying for what he thinks will never be, his life in the Shire, being comforted by Frodo. Which mollified me somewhat re: my other issues with PJ over Frodo's heroism.

Anyway, it's a very beautiful, very pure scene. It really does achieve the glorious spirit, the "sanctification" that pervades the book.

Elijah's and Sean's expressions are remarkable in this scene. They really ARE, both of them, Frodo and Sam come to life. Ah me!

I think that Tolkien would have liked this scene.

Jan's poem is lovely as always.
Mechtild
mechtild at 2007-10-23 03:02 (UTC) (Link)
It *is* "a very beautiful, very pure scene", and they played it that way, to the very highest of their abilities. They..."showed their quality". And the way Frodo comforts Sam is like the Balm of Gilead to the tortured heart in every viewer.

Yes, Jan's poem is all that. There aren't many more to go, but they are all exceptional. Thanks for commenting, Pearl. :)
verangel
verangel at 2007-10-23 02:45 (UTC) (Link)
I have to add...for me, I went from FS to WS, back and forth. I wanted to see Frodo in this moment as close as possible, because, his face was the text. He made me feel and cry and embrace this moment. Honestly, He is incredible here..Elijah...is. Both he and Sean are so into it..but Peter thankfully let Frodo's intesity show more..or maybe, he let Elijah show what he can...and he did. This scene I have fast forwarded and slowed down and looked at over and over again...because it is so beautiful I took my breath away.
Watching the tears slide naturally from his eyes. The closeness of these two little halflings. So little but so strong and realizing death. The way they embrace and then..
" Frodo: I’m glad to be with you, Samwise Gamgee, here, at the end of all thing."

There is no simpler comment...but nothing that could be stronger than that. It said it all. And in that moment, Elijah's face, the dialogue before, brought the whole journey there and back in a heartstopping final moment.

I am so in love with this movie..and these moments opened my heart.
Jan's poem is so beautiful. There are so many moments that hurt and melt my heart. But I wasnt' there in the first screencaps you did. I can't help let myself go here. To me...Elijah is the poem. He made Frodo so beautiful. He made these words happen.
xoxoxo thank you. v




Mechtild
mechtild at 2007-10-23 03:19 (UTC) (Link)
But I wasnt' there in the first screencaps you did. I can't help let myself go here.

I'm not absolutely sure from this whether seeing the fullscreen caps (the first ones I made of the scene, a year ago) was helpful to you or not, Verangel, but it's clear that you love this scene, and are deeply moved by it, and by Frodo's face in it. He really does have a gift, as shown here, and the camera and lighting people made the most of that gift, I thought.

Well, I thought Sam was super, too, but it was the main purpose of the scene--I think--to show Frodo's first post-destruction of the Ring-euphoria, and his restored ability to be a strength and comfort to others (Sam, in this case), which meant most of the closeups went to him. And what close-ups they are!

The shots of his face as he hears the sorrow in Sam's speech affect me most; I always begin to weep as I watch his face turn from ecstasy to sorrowful empathy for Sam's grief. (In the fullscreen enteries, they are mostly in pt. 3.)
(Deleted comment)
wakerobin at 2007-10-23 21:46 (UTC) (Link)
It really is painful sometimes to look at Elijah as Frodo. It's a combination of Elijah's ability to convey emotion and his heart-stopping physical beauty. That sequence where he goes from feeling relieved to feeling heartache for Sam's plight - explain to me where an 18 year old actor goes to find that perfect expression? He is...ineffable.
Mechtild
mechtild at 2007-10-24 00:38 (UTC) (Link)
See below, but I agree at EW was astonishing, and moving, in this scene. As you say, how could an 18-year-old, or even a 20-year-old, find it within himself to play this scene so well?
Mechtild
mechtild at 2007-10-24 00:37 (UTC) (Link)
He really was magnificent in this role, even if he does another film worthy of note.
julchen11
julchen11 at 2007-10-27 22:17 (UTC) (Link)
Oh my, sweetie. I'm glad to be back and now it's time to come back to all your wonderful entries.

This scene is so very important to me, and very very emotional, too. I'm sure even if they didn't say a single word we would know what they are talking. We just have to look at their faces.
Frodo's and Sam's tears - all I can say is it hurts so wonderful. You know what I mean?
Finally Frodo is Sam's hero. In the first movies Sam has to be the strong one, for Frodo, for himself. And he so needs support and help, too. I remember watching the scene the first time few years ago I was overwhelmed and all in tears - watching it now nothing has changed.
Both actors are playing their roles on a very high level. Elijah - or should I say Frodo - looks much older than he was those times, very wise and even here you can see this special "inner glow".
Sean Astin - he surprises me all the time watching him in this movies.
I can't remember a movie with an intensity so deep and pure like this.

Jan's poem - oh, lady. It gave me chills. I read it and I couldn't read anything else after it. I had to think about it, her poems always "speak" to me.
Emotional, touching and the charm of her words dwell not in the words themselves but in the echoe of my heart.


"Your voice,
strange,

desperately beautiful,

like the first voice
I ever heard,
welcomes me........

What

are you saying?


'Home'"

Thank you, ladies - I owe you something for this beauty of words and sight.

Love and hugs,
Julchen

Mechtild
mechtild at 2007-10-30 02:12 (UTC) (Link)
This really is a stupendous scene, so beautiful and so moving at the same time. And, yes, what a poem! Thanks so much for this series of comments, Julchen. It's always such a pleasure to read your posts.
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