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NF-Lee's Gildor and Frodo

Shelob’s Lair Pt. 3 ~ Shelob is perceived, plus jan-u-wine's "That Which Waits"... (#3 of 9)

Posted on 2007.08.04 at 00:32
Tags: , ,
~*~



In Pt. 3 we are treated to more fine acting from Elijah Wood, thus more fine screencaps.

Complementing this sequence is a poem by jan-u-wine, That Which Waits. Her deft use of images, particularly, sharpens my sense of Frodo’s moment of realisation in the tunnel. It is posted below the screencaps.

The only other thing I want to lift up in this post is the passage from the book text where Sam remembers the phial of Galadriel. I so appreciated that the filmmakers picked up Sam’s vision and put it into the film, even if in another place, and experienced by Frodo instead of Sam.

Here’s what Sam sees in his mind’s eye:


Then, as he stood, darkness about him and a blackness of despair and anger in his heart, it seemed to him that he saw a light: a light in his mind, almost unbearably bright at first, as a sun-ray to the eyes of one long hidden in a windowless pit. Then the light became colour: green, gold, silver, white.

Far off, as in a little picture drawn by elven-fingers, he saw the Lady Galadriel standing on the grass in Lórien, and gifts were in her hands. And you, Ring-bearer, he heard her say, remote but clear, for you I have prepared this.


I think the book moment is beautiful just as Tolkien has described it. I love the notion of Sam seeing the image of Galadriel in Lórien as small, painted with Elven deftness, making me think of Dutch miniatures from the Renaissance, with their astonishing detail and jewel colours. Examining one is like peering into another world. But I think Jackson did marvellously translating the moment to film, transforming it from Sam's enchanted miniature to Frodo's vision of Galadriel in Lórien, huge on the big screen, radiant, otherwordly, stooping to him like the living icon of a great goddess.

For those who never saw the post with the caps of Frodo's vision in the Pass, they are here.

~*~


Below is the larger book excerpt, putting Sam's vision in context. It continues directly from the passage quoted in the previous instalment.



Book scene, from Shelob’s Tunnel, TTT.


They had not gone more than a few yards when from behind them came a sound, startling and horrible in the heavy padded silence: a gurgling, bubbling noise, and a long venomous hiss. They wheeled round, but nothing could be seen. Still as stones they stood, staring, waiting for they did not know what.

‘It’s a trap!’ said Sam, and he laid his hand upon the hilt of his sword; and as he did so, he thought of the darkness of the barrow whence it came. ‘I wish old Tom was near us now!’ he thought. Then, as he stood, darkness about him and a blackness of despair and anger in his heart, it seemed to him that he saw a light: a light in his mind, almost unbearably bright at first, as a sun-ray to the eyes of one long hidden in a windowless pit. Then the light became colour: green, gold, silver, white. Far off, as in a little picture drawn by elven-fingers, he saw the Lady Galadriel standing on the grass in Lórien, and gifts were in her hands. And you, Ring-bearer, he heard her say, remote but clear, for you I have prepared this.

The bubbling hiss drew nearer, and there was a creaking as of some great jointed thing that moved with slow purpose in the dark. A reek came on before it. ‘Master, master!’ cried Sam, and life and urgency came back into his voice. ‘The Lady’s gift! The star-glass!’

‘The star-glass?’ muttered Frodo, as one answering out of sleep, hardly comprehending. ‘Why yes! Why had I forgotten it? A light when all other lights go out! And now indeed light alone can help us.’


~*~




Film Scene: Frodo realises his plight.


There are no lines for this sequence. Frodo runs blindly on, seeing dead things hanging in webs. He stumbles, falling into a mass of web and bones. Distraught and on the edge of hysteria, in his mind he hears the voice of Galadriel.

Galadriel: And you, Frodo Baggins, I give you the Light of Eärendil, our most beloved star. May it be a light for you in dark places, when all other lights go out.


~*~













~ Frodo perceives the presence of Shelob:


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[Scene switches to Sam finding the lembas on the Stairs.]


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~*~








That Which Waits

~ by jan-u-wine



a black eye,
glittering
like a bead
lost between sunlight
and shadow,
glints beneath ragged
white.

Shapes......

shapes of things
that were
and are not....

things

that should not be here,

here in the fearful silence.

I should not be here,
wrapped in darkness
so full
it is like a slow river
of night,

pulling me inside itself.

I am finally

alone.

So alone

and
lost.

Not just in the darkness
that has
become a living thing.

No.

I had not accounted for
the darkness
that lives
within

and touches
my mind
with blackened hands

until

every shadow

bleeds terror,

every sound
runs quick-silver
fear through my mind.

What is it.....

what

is it

I hear?


Nothing.

It is

nothing.

Nothing before

nor

behind me.

Nothing below
nor
above.


Nothing

waits

for me.



Oh.







~*~







Entries in the Shelob's Lair series:



~ Pt. 1: Entering the tunnel.


~ Pt. 2: Frodo is betrayed.


~ Pt. 3: Shelob perceived, plus jan-u-wine’s “That Which Waits”.


~ Pt. 4: The Star-glass.


~ Pt. 5: Shelob attacks.


~ Pt. 6: Gollum taunts Frodo.


~ Pt. 7: Frodo attacked by Gollum.


~ Pt. 8: Gollum makes his plea.


~ Pt. 9: Frodo resolves to go forward, plus jan-u-wine’s “The Web-ring”.




Tables of Links:



~ Entries with jan-u-wine's poems


~ Frodo and Elijah screencaps Main Page.



~ Mechtild


Comments:


Shirebound
shirebound at 2007-08-04 13:29 (UTC) (Link)
And you, Ring-bearer, he heard her say, remote but clear, for you I have prepared this.

That's one of my favorite lines in the whole trilogy.
mechling at 2007-08-04 14:30 (UTC) (Link)
Me too! When Galadriel is not being portrayed as 'armed and dangerous', I really do *love* what they did presenting her character in the films.

~ Mechtild
mews1945
mews1945 at 2007-08-04 15:16 (UTC) (Link)
Thanks for linking back to the scene with Frodo's vision of Galadriel. I love that scene, because it shows so clearly Frodo's strength and determination in the face of exhyaustion and betrayal and his own guilt for allowing Gollum to undermine his faith in Sam. All that is shown on that face. And it also portrays Galadriel's majesty, and her "perilousness" perfectly, to my mind.

These scenes in Shelob's lair are so intense and scary, and again, Elijah portrays Frodo's terror so perfectly, without a word of dialogue. The poem is wonderful, so deep and atmospheric, a dark dream.
Mechtild
mechtild at 2007-08-04 17:49 (UTC) (Link)
it shows so clearly Frodo's strength and determination in the face of exhaustion and betrayal and his own guilt for allowing Gollum to undermine his faith in Sam. All that is shown on that face. And it also portrays Galadriel's majesty, and her "perilousness" perfectly, to my mind.

Ooooh, well said. I especially loved the way you described what I was trying to describe about Galadriel at her film best, but you said it better: "her 'perilousness'"; "her majesty". Wow. I love that, Mews.

Actually, I made more caps of that scene in the Pass when Frodo has his vision, but not of the vision itself. I wanted to show more of the preceding and succeeding frames, until he gets ambushed.

Jan-u-wine's poem really is good with these screencaps. She even picks up the dead bird's black bead-like eye, making fine yet subtle use of the image. (I know, I know, what's that bird doing deep in Shelob's lair, anyway?). She says so much with just the right choice of words. Some readers, she has told me, have found her poems typically long, but they aren't, really, not in words. Even when they go on for a few pages (in Word), it's not as though she has written pages of dense verse, like a sonnet three pages long. They trail down the page like thought clusters, sometimes only one word long. I always get the feeling, when I'm reading her Frodo poems, that the poems record the innermost, unacknowledged processes of his thought. A lot of meaning and nuance established with not that many words. Alas, I'm just the opposite! Maybe that difference makes her gift all the more attractive to me.
Estë   (or ST for short)
este_tangletoes at 2007-08-06 12:17 (UTC) (Link)
The terror, to me, is more pronounced when the scene is viewed as stills. *Shudders*

Jan-u-wine's poem, with its looming unseen terror, made the hair on my arms stand on end and my heart rate increase. I think that her Frodo poetry is the best I have read.

Many thanks Ladies!

--Estë
Mechtild
mechtild at 2007-08-06 13:23 (UTC) (Link)
Ooooh, Estë! Thanks. And I'll have to send a little note to Jan to tell her to look at your comment. What a compliment--but I agree with you. :)
julchen11
julchen11 at 2007-10-27 23:18 (UTC) (Link)
“And you, Ring-bearer, he heard her say, remote but clear, for you I have prepared this”

One of my favourite lines of the movies … written on a memo, put on the bathroom mirror welcoming me daily good morning (together with on of your screencaps)

Isn’t this guy stunning ? The terror in his face …
I’m sorry – I’m sure you’ll get bored with my comments. Maybe I should keep them short …

Jan’s poem – she’s a marvel, isn’t she? Perfect words … the poems captures the scene perfectly, another time she gave me goosebumps …
Touching and terrific – as always – and another time you both left me speechless and … thoughtful.

Thank you, sweeties!

Mechtild
mechtild at 2007-10-30 02:11 (UTC) (Link)
Yes, it's such a good poem, brief as it is. I love this image of the darkness:

wrapped in darkness
so full
it is like a slow river
of night,

pulling me inside itself.


Wow.
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