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NF-Lee's Gildor and Frodo

HA: #3 of 7 ~ "Shall I shoot?" ~ plus poem by jan-u-wine....

Posted on 2007.05.09 at 22:25
Tags: , ,
~*~


Henneth Annun, Pt. 3: Faramir asks Frodo if he should shoot, plus jan-u-wine’s Mí Isilmë.


The images from this set of screencaps are my favourites of Frodo in The Two Towers. His beauty in these is astonishing, but his expression is at least as impressive. What the filmmakers took away from Frodo, in terms of what he actually said and did in these scenes, was nearly restored in this sequence. The book's account of Frodo's mixed feelings towards Gollum are played out on his face so clearly it is as if his features were visible words speaking the text.

Jan-u-wine's poem inspired by this scene, Mí Isilmë, expresses further what might be Frodo's thoughts and feelings in this scene. The poem is posted below the screencaps.


~*~



Book scene, continued, from “The Forbidden Pool”:



‘Shall we shoot?’ said Faramir, turning quickly to Frodo.

Frodo did not answer for a moment. Then ‘No!’ he said. ‘No! I beg you not to.’ If Sam had dared, he would have said ‘Yes,’ quicker and louder. He could not see, but he guessed well enough from their words what they were looking at.

‘You know, then, what this thing is?’ said Faramir. Come, now you have seen, tell me why it should be spared. In all our words together you have not once spoken of your gangrel companion, and I let him be for the time.’ (…) But now he has done worse trespass than only to go coney-snaring in the uplands: he has dared to come to Henneth Annun, and his life is forfeit. I marvel at the creature: so secret and so sly as he is, to come sporting in the pool before our very window. Does he think that men sleep without watch all night? Why does he so?’

‘There are two answers, I think,’ said Frodo. ‘For one thing, he knows little of Men, and sly though he is, your refuge is so hidden that perhaps he does not know that Men are concealed here. For another, I think he is allured here by a mastering desire, stronger than his caution.’

‘He is lured here, you say?’ said Faramir in a low voice. ‘Can he, does he then know of your burden?’

‘Indeed yes. He bore it himself for many years.’

He bore it?’ said Faramir, breathing sharply in his wonder. ‘This matter winds itself ever in new riddles. Then he is pursuing it?’

‘Maybe. It is precious to him. But I did not speak of that.’

‘What then does the creature seek?’

‘Fish,’ said Frodo. ‘Look!’

(…)

‘Now I have him at the arrow-point,’ said Anborn. ‘Shall I not shoot, Captain? For coming unbidden to this place death is our law.’

‘Wait, Anborn,’ said Faramir. ‘This is a harder matter than it seems. What have you to say now, Frodo? Why should we spare?’

‘The creature is wretched and hungry,’ said Frodo, ‘and unaware of his danger. And Gandalf, your Mithrandir, he would have bidden you not to slay him for that reason, and for others. He forbade the Elves to do so. I do not know clearly why, and of what I guess I cannot speak openly out here. But this creature is in some way bound up with my errand. Until you found us and took us, he was my guide.’

‘Your guide!’ said Faramir. ‘This matter becomes ever stranger. I would do much for you, Frodo, but this I cannot grant: to let this sly wanderer go free at his own will from here, to join you later if it please him, or to be caught by Orcs and tell all he knows under the threat of pain. He must be slain or taken. But how can this slippery thing of many guises be caught, saved by a feathered shaft?’

‘Let me go down quietly to him,’ said Frodo. You may keep your bows bent, and shoot me at least, if I fail. I shall not run away.’



"‘The creature is wretched and hungry,’ said Frodo, ‘and unaware of his danger" (my emphases). This is enough for Frodo, as it was for Bilbo. As the Prologue of FotR recounted in the history of the finding of the Ring,


Bilbo was tempted to slay [Gollum] with his sword. But pity stayed him, and though he kept the ring, in which his only hope lay, he would not use it to help him kill the wretched creature at a disadvantage.

This is my sort of hero.


~*~





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Film Scene: Frodo observes Gollum.



Faramir and Frodo stand on the ledge high above the Forbidden Pool. He eyes Frodo keenly as he speaks.

Faramir: To enter the Forbidden Pool bears the penalty of death.

Archers step out from the bushes, ready to shoot.

Faramir: They wait for my command. Shall I shoot?

Gollum: (Singing to himself loudly as he whacks a fish on a rock.) The rock and pool is nice and cool, so juicy sweet. Our only wish, to catch a fish, so juicy sweet!

Frodo: (To Faramir.) Wait. This creature is bound to me, and I to him. (Faramir’s face shows astonishment.) He is our guide. Please, let me go down to him. (Faramir nods his assent.)



~*~








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Mí Isilmë *

~ jan-u-wine



Mí Isilmë



Fragile-parchment-pale,
this moon,

head drowned in lemon water-clouds,

light falling all but to naught
within the pool’s dark hunger.

Brittle sharp-bitter rock

reminds
my feet

they are far
from the gentle paths of Home,

Winter’s dying fingers
make their cold rest beneath my cloak.



Somehow,
there is a blessedness to this place…..

a
remembrance
of good

lingers here.

I feel it,
as if the stones themselves yet

echo
from feet glad with the walking,

as if the waters of the pool

recall
the moment their chill beauty gained crystalline voice.


Sudden understanding fills me,
holds me in gladsome silence:


This is my Home.

This, as much as any other.


When I am far from this place,

lost
and weary of my burden,

it will call to me,

its voice a shadow upon the wind,
its memoried touch a comfort

in lands emptied of all but dread.

In dremes

the Window
shall open ever before me,

blood-sun scattering His purse of colour
(spendthrift lord of light)
upon the water’s

silver veil.

In dremes shall I see this moon,
smell the grasses lying tender and sweet
beneath it,

feel the wind which remembers the Sea upon my cheek.


But now there are no dremes.

Only water glinting cold below,
and a voice,

twisted by sorrow and treacherous time,
speaking to itself in the pitiable night.

It is part of me, too,
this voice,

as much a part of me as the weight
which bows my head,

Or my Home, so many grievous leagues behind.


Memory and madness,
this voice,

betrayed and betrayer,
this voice,

wretch
and

wretched,
this voice.


I give him over to judgement.


To save him,
I tell myself,

to save him.

In time, perchance, he may

return
the favour,

repay this well-intended deceit with one of his own.


In time,
he may be

the saving
of me.

______________________
*Quenya: In Moonlight





~*~






Related Entries:


~ HA 1 ~ Faramir questions Frodo and Sam.


~ HA 2 ~ “Come with me!” Faramir tells Frodo.


~ HA 3 ~ Faramir asks, “Shall I shoot?”


~ HA 4 ~ “Trust Master!” ~ Frodo tries to persuade Sméagol.


~ HA 5 ~ “Don’t hurt him!” ~ Faramir’s men capture Sméagol.


~ HA 6 ~ The Goons of Gondor: the EE interrogation of Gollum.


~ HA 7 ~ “The Ring is taking me, Sam”.





Other screencap entries:



~ Entries with jan-u-wine's poems.


~ All Frodo and Elijah screencaps.




~ Mechtild


Comments:


Claudia's Cove
claudia603 at 2007-05-10 11:51 (UTC) (Link)
Nope. The one you posted before I thought was breath-taking...but this was absolutely stunning...*is dizzy from Frodo love*

And that poem? It really moved me!
Mechtild
mechtild at 2007-05-10 13:35 (UTC) (Link)
Yeah, these sets of screencaps are rather like blows, but the blows delivered are by Beauty, each one more deliciously devastating than the last. This sort of abuse I can take!

Yes, the poem is soooooooooo good, and so insightful for this scene.
Shirebound
shirebound at 2007-05-10 11:54 (UTC) (Link)
This really was a beautifully shot scene, and that first picture of Frodo just melts my heart.
Mechtild
mechtild at 2007-05-10 13:36 (UTC) (Link)
Yes, he is meltingly appealing in that moment. How could film Faramir be so impervious? I know; it was in the script. ;)
Gentle Hobbit
gentlehobbit at 2007-05-10 12:31 (UTC) (Link)
Jan-u-wine's poem really stood out for me here. There is a wistful, anxious, almost dream-like quality that matches the pictures. You two work so well together -- she with the words and you with the pictures (and the book & movie summaries). It's just a pleasure to see such lovely collaborative posts. :)
Mechtild
mechtild at 2007-05-10 13:38 (UTC) (Link)
Thanks, Gentlehobbit. Yes, I think her poems open up the visuals to deeper meaning and nuances, but the visuals offer imaginative settings for her poems. They do really go together well. There won't be another Jan poem in the TTT series, but there are some coming in the RotK material. Woo hoo!
(Deleted comment)
Mechtild
mechtild at 2007-05-10 13:41 (UTC) (Link)
Yes, poetry is like that. Maybe poems are to prose what screencaps are to the filmed scenes they come from. They stop the action and time and let the viewer/reader enter into them more. They're "simpler" (one image paused, a spare series of words on a page), but they offer the framework for so much, depending on the perceptions of the reader or viewer, resonating and resonating and resonating.

Thanks so much for commenting, Mews.
blink back to let me know
bunniewabbit at 2007-05-10 17:17 (UTC) (Link)
Good golly, that last cap. *faints a little*

You put in an astonishing amount of work on all these entries. I just love them!
Mechtild
mechtild at 2007-05-10 20:37 (UTC) (Link)
I feel faint over the whole series, Bunnie. ;) He's just the ultimate in this series of caps, to my mind. So unbelievably, classical-painting beautiful, but so heart-wrenchingly expressive and soulful. *huge sigh*

Thanks for commenting, Bunnie. I'm glad you are enjoying them.
pearlette
pearlette at 2007-05-10 19:33 (UTC) (Link)
"I would do much for you, Frodo".

Book: How I looooove Captain Faramir. Guuuuuuuuh. *dies*

Film: And how could ANYONE, on Eru's green earth, POSSIBLY resist that gorgeous, pleading, angelic face? Guuuuuuuuuuh. *dies* The Renaissance angel hobbit!

Poem: Very beautiful, very vivid and very moving. Memory and madness ... betrayed and betrayer ...

Mechtild
mechtild at 2007-05-10 20:42 (UTC) (Link)
Yes, book Faramir has a character one doesn't come by too often. Not in the film, either. But as I said to your previous comment, he does improve dramatically in the last film. He's been in therapy, or Gandalf has turned up and given him a sound talking-to.

I don't know how Faramir could resist that face, either. That's someone else, I think: some Faramir look-alike possessing him, who fails to see Frodo's worth and wisdom.
Estë   (or ST for short)
este_tangletoes at 2007-05-14 07:47 (UTC) (Link)
Oh, my goodness! Look at that face!

These caps are gorgeous Mechling! Are you trying to kill me?

The first screen cap - Faramir and Frodo stand on the ledge high above the Forbidden Pool -made me think of art by Gustav Doré.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gustave_Dor%C3%A9


When I am far from this place,

lost
and weary of my burden,

it will call to me,

its voice a shadow upon the wind,
its memoried touch a comfort

in lands emptied of all but dread.



Jan’s poem is simply beautiful. I can almost believe that I am there.

Thank you ladies.

--Estë

mechling at 2007-05-14 12:29 (UTC) (Link)
Isn't it great? The poem? I thought the caps illuminated it so well. (And what caps, I agree!)

I opened the Dore link, Este, and saved many. He would have been a great LotR illustrator. In fact many of the plates reminded me of scenes from the tales of M-E (not just LotR). I should do a post about them one day. Thanks so much for this link--and for the lovely comments.

~ Mechtild
frodosweetstuff
frodosweetstuff at 2007-05-21 13:47 (UTC) (Link)
*drools* *drools* *drools* The ones where Frodo looks up at Faramir right at the end... *drools more*

Thank you! :)
Mechtild
mechtild at 2007-05-21 14:46 (UTC) (Link)
*drools* *drools* *drools*

Hey! We're getting this page all wet!
frodosweetstuff
frodosweetstuff at 2007-05-23 16:32 (UTC) (Link)
I hope you think that is a good thing... ;-)
julchen11
julchen11 at 2007-05-31 21:36 (UTC) (Link)
This has always been my favourite scene of TTT. The screencaps, oh my those caps are perfect for staring … dreaming. Beautiful Frodo, the expression on his face kills me all the time. I’m melting looking at picture no. 1, 2, 3 … I’m deader than dead now. Your entry you posted before I thought – yes, that’s the best. And now … I am unable to write (it isn’t that easy to write with trembling fingers). This face, look at the expression on his face.

And the poem. Oh my, It’s so very moving. It’s simply Jan-u-wine. Inspiring, touching, heartbreakingly beautiful. The last sentence … the breaker! It mirrors Frodo’s face perfectly.

This post, the caps, your comments, the book and movie sequence , Jan’s poem – you are wonderful.
I want to say so much more but it seems I lost all vocabulary I’ve learned the last months.

Beautiful, gorgeous, lovingly done.
Thank you mechtild, thank you Jan-u-wine.

*hugs you both* Another time you made my night ...
Mechtild
mechtild at 2007-06-01 02:13 (UTC) (Link)
Thanks so much, Julchen, for the lovely comment. These are some of my favourite images of Frodo in the films, he is so beautiful, so expressive, so feeling--and all at the same time. The lighting is beautiful, setting him off as if he were made for moonlight.

And I think Jan's poem expresses Frodo's inner side so well. I am glad you loved it, too.
Hobbity forever
periantari at 2007-08-24 04:57 (UTC) (Link)
I’m deader than dead now.
i agree with that 110% lol! yeah i can't type correctly... must come back to read all the accompanying text..... lol
Hobbity forever
periantari at 2007-08-24 04:56 (UTC) (Link)
That last cap killed me...... yeah....whoa... ::swooning incontrollably::
omg. yeah. Frodo love is forever. ♥
Mechtild
mechtild at 2007-08-25 02:15 (UTC) (Link)
He *is* breathtakingly, heart-rendingly beautiful in these, I agree.
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