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NF-Lee's Gildor and Frodo

Frodo caps, cont'd: The Eyes veiled, in a Purple Lorien....

Posted on 2005.11.16 at 19:43
Tags: , , , , ,
~*~

Yep, another set of gorgeous close-ups of film Frodo.

This set is from a brief moment in "Teaser Two," included in the FotR TE DVD Extras. Yes, this beautiful sequence comes from yet another theatrical trailer for Fellowship. How the fans must have been going berserk. I never saw any of these trailers, of course, since I didn't watch television and never went to the movies. Silly, silly me!

I've seen one or two of these caps floating around over the past two years, but I never knew where they came from. The final scenes were washed in blue, not purple. Was this orchid light used anywhere in the finished cut? I think it is magical.

So, here is another series of frames in which not much happens. (No, this is not the whole series, believe it or not.)

How many caps can a fan want, merely showing her hero's eyes closing while he lets his head tip forward fractionally?

A lot.

What a face, even with his eyes closed. That sweep of those lashes is just, so ... oh, words fail me!




Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting



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Click HERE for table of Frodo and Elijah Wood Screencaps.



~ Mechtild

Comments:


shelbyshire
shelbyshire at 2005-11-17 04:03 (UTC) (Link)
Yes, they are beautiful beyond words! Thank you. I've been saving one or two or three or four or...each time you post them. I wonder just how many pictures a computer can hold before exploding!!
Mechtild
mechtild at 2005-11-17 04:23 (UTC) (Link)
Oh, I think it can hold quite a few. I saved them all as JPEG documents, which don't use up so many bytes. Or whatever they are, the things that measure digital space.

They are lovely, aren't they, Shelbyshire? Did you read the little inset I copied with Ian Holm, Ian McKellen and Chris Lee cooing over EW as Frodo back in 2001? They were so right.

The only cap I ever have seen from this series is one that Narya Celebrian likes to post. I always loved it from first sight, saving it into my photo files. What a thrill to find its source and be able to slobber over the whole sequence!

~ Mechtild
Mechtild
mechtild at 2005-11-17 04:25 (UTC) (Link)
Shelbyshire, try scrolling up the images from the bottom. In that manner, you can see Frodo open his eyes instead of closing them. It's lovely. *stomach flutters*
(Anonymous) at 2005-11-17 08:07 (UTC) (Link)
I am lost – I think I now understand why some are prepared to sell their soul.

I have never seen any image as beautiful as Elijah Wood portraying Frodo.

Estë
Mechtild
mechtild at 2005-11-17 13:33 (UTC) (Link)
I am lost – I think I now understand why some are prepared to sell their soul.

Estë, did you mean that some would sell their soul to look like this, or sell their souls to be able to have the one who looks like this? The introduction of the word, "soul," is good. For his beauty is the sort that seems to stir not just the body, not just the mind, not just the heart, but the soul.
Maewyn
maewyn_2 at 2005-11-17 11:24 (UTC) (Link)
These are so beautiful!

The pic I had was a .gif, and it wouldn't open on my photo editor (I could only see it as a thumbnail). Now I have eight perfect pictures I can look at and enlarge and swoon at to my heart's content.

Thank you!

Mechtild
mechtild at 2005-11-17 13:34 (UTC) (Link)
Maewyn, go back to the entry that featured the two strings of caps showing Frodo smiling at the Farewell Party. Blossom made gifs of them and posted the links in her comments box. They are quite good.

But, there was a gif of this purple series? Wow.
Maewyn
maewyn_2 at 2005-11-17 14:07 (UTC) (Link)
I missed her comment with it's gif(t)s before. Well done, Blossom!

My picture must have been a proper .gif originally, but it didn't "work". It just showed as a thumbnail. I have no idea where I got it. My collection has come from many and varied sources!

taerie
taerie at 2005-11-17 12:59 (UTC) (Link)
This is getting addictive! First thing in the morning I log on with sweaty palms to see what you have uploaded. My desktop picture is changing every day and my heart is under a lot of stress.
I know! you are going to start CHARGING for this service as soon as you are sure you have us all hooked. Insidious!
Mechtild
mechtild at 2005-11-17 13:38 (UTC) (Link)
This is getting addictive!

Yes, Taerie, it is. I haven't got a thing done on that new chapter I've been stalled on. It's so much more immediately gratifying to gaze at the film, frame by frame, fiddle over the prints to ready them for posting, post them, then gaze at them some more. I just love running the entries backwards. The sight of him opening his eyes as if he were sensing me watching him, with my feelings plainly visible on my face, is very swoon-inducing.
(Anonymous) at 2005-11-17 14:14 (UTC) (Link)
Originally I meant that some would sell their soul in order to have someone like this, but now that you mention it, it could be either or.

Quote:

For his beauty is the sort that seems to stir not just the body, not just the mind, not just the heart, but the soul.

I wholeheartedly agree with you. Although being that beautiful in real life could have its down-side.

Estë
Mechtild
mechtild at 2005-11-17 14:55 (UTC) (Link)
...being that beautiful in real life could have its down-side...

Ah, but Estë, he isn't that beautiful in real life. (EW) Only in film-Frodo life is EW that beautiful. Film-Frodo's male beauty is so ravishing, it is literally out of this world. Sometimes, when I think of the reaction Frodo has elicited from us extreme film Frodo fans, I think it must have come out of a yearning that had been a long time in the making. It's as if film-Frodo has been a figure haunting our aesthetic and erotic imaginations, perhaps all our lives, only we hadn't realise it until we saw it brought to heart-stopping life on a screen. There was our half-glimpsed dream lover unveiled: beauitful in an otherworldly way, but warm, breathing, speaking, and enlivened by a soul of luminous beauty.

It's like the story in the Greek myth, when Pygmalion the sculptor creates a statue so beautiful to him, Galatea, he pines for it with love that can't be satisfied by any woman on earth. Aphrodite, pitying him, lets the statue come to life beneath his hands. This myth is often pointed to, to show how people fall in love with their own creations. But I have more of a Platonist streak than that. Pygmalion was an artist, but did he "create" the statue, or was it more true that the image of his ideal lover merely "emerged" from the stone, through his efforts? The ideal was there, lurking in the marble; he merely brought it out.

We haven't ourselves created film Frodo, someone else did, Tolkien, an actor, and a whole team of artists. But I think even before the films, all of us had partially formed images in our minds -- which are creations of sorts -- images which represented some sort of unattainable ideal of the lover we pined for, and of which we were only dimly aware. What we saw on the screen was so overwhelming to many of us, it was as if that half-known dream lover had been brought to life, fully-formed, enfleshed in this beautiful character played by this exquisite-looking young man, beautifully costumed and lit and photographed, in gorgeous scene after gorgeous scene.

I think many of us felt as if "the marble had come to life". And we were a'goners.

Ah, just gassing. I have to get the garbage out for the trash me. From the sublime to the necessary. But that's real life, ey?
taerie
taerie at 2005-11-18 02:20 (UTC) (Link)
>It's as if film-Frodo has been a figure haunting our aesthetic and erotic imaginations, perhaps all our lives,

I love how you make me think about these things.
Frodo was already a big part of my life too. I fell in love with the soul that shined out of Tolkien's books as Frodo a very long time ago and have honoured him every way I could think of for literally most of my life. THEN he walked out of my imagination onto the screen and became a fully realized vision. And his form matched the soul I so loved beyond ANY expectation I dared to have! I guess I have good reason to go a little crazy.
(Okay a LOT.)
Mechtild
mechtild at 2005-11-18 03:47 (UTC) (Link)
I fell in love with the soul that shined out of Tolkien's books as Frodo a very long time ago and have honoured him every way I could think of for literally most of my life. THEN he walked out of my imagination onto the screen and became a fully realized vision. And his form matched the soul I so loved beyond ANY expectation I dared to have!

I think this happened to many fans, from what they have said in posts. I loved Frodo in the books, too, but I didn't think of him as a "soul" person in the books, mostly as honourable; noble-spirited. But, on film, he became ... I don't know ... accessible, emotionally, to a high degree. And, yes, he was, "soulful". Literally, full of soul. I didn't think of book Frodo in this way. Book Frodo has a lot of soul, of course, but he's not what I would call, "soulful."

I never sensed or saw the "dreamy" or "magic" quality in Frodo in the books, either, and Elijah's Frodo has it in spades. I still don't see it when I am reading. When I am reading, Frodo is perceptive, decent, kind, honest, fair; warm and funny but a little reserved: an utterly lovable and admirable hobbit: brave in spite of terrible fear, and strong-willed in spite of despair.

I think it's the eyes. Elijah Wood's eyes really are out of this world. Book Frodo has nice but normal eyes. He's "fairer than most," not drop-dead beautiful. He is a hobbit, not an Elf dressed as a hobbit. I mean, film Frodo was the best-looking person, male or female, in the whole film. That would not be so in the books. As Faramir said to the two hobbits in Henneth Annun, he had thought they might be Elves at first, but closer to, he could see that they could not be Elves, "for Elves are very fair to look upon."
taerie
taerie at 2005-11-18 18:14 (UTC) (Link)
will admit that fairer than most was about the only thing in Gandalf's description that really fit movie Frodo. I wouldn't have expected him to have waxed rhapsodically given the typical male aversion to get enthusiastic at all about another males looks. LOL!
If elves are fairer than movie Frodo as Faramir implied then you are right, elves would presumably burn your retinas out to look at.. but standards of beauty can vary. (Another rationalization, but Hell, there were certainly worse discrepancies in the movie than Frodo's extreme appeal to the female of the species that you would really think would cause him to be at LEAST walking around with a line of cow-eyed hobbit girls hanging on to him. :-)
You know, not everybody sees him as the heart-stopping picture of glowing perfection that we do. My husband, for instance, thinks he's a cute little guy but doesn't see any special reason to consider him gorgeous. (And he will and has admitted to me if he thinks a guy is handsome.. even if I AM swooning. I have always been able to trust him for a straight opinion.) I have even talked to women who feel that way. Certainly, there are a bazillion teenage and not so teenage Legolas fans who would argue with you on who is the best looking person. (Shrug. (Fine with me.. that's just a bazillion less women to compete for a place in line for Frodo. The world, I have noticed, is full of strange people.. with to me, incomprehensible tastes :-))
I did, indeed, see him as very filled with Soul.. AND I also saw him as dreamy and a bit glowy.. and yeah.. I wouldn't even rule out the word magic. I certainly saw no big discrepancy in that though I would have to read the book over again to tell you what gave me those impressions. If I had been in charge of creating Frodo for the screen.. I don't think really it would have varied much from what we saw. Those things were part of how I perceived Frodo from the beginning.. although admittedly it doesn't fit Tolkien's physical description of him. Maybe the people making the movie subconsciously saw him as I did.. the extreme beauty within him showing on the outside.
Still, I suppose that is also a question of who is reading the book and individual interpretation. I have always obviously had that particular hobbit on a huge pedestal of love and affection. Seeing him looking like this on top of it as I said, was a powerful experience to say the least.
Thank you again and again for performing the vital service of putting up gorgeous screen caps and I am REALLY enjoying your travelogues of the Frodian landscape and comparisons in art. Very fun reading.
Mechtild
mechtild at 2005-11-18 19:01 (UTC) (Link)

On the possible uneasiness Frodo's attractiveness can provoke

Taerie, yes, you did see a lot more to Frodo than I did, reading the book. I think that's why people like me (who saw a noble but very hobbity Frodo) were so floored to see him in the films and to find themselves responding to him with erotic love. We just hadn't felt a glimmer of that, reading the book. Readers who most saw Frodo as beautiful and Elvish and magical in their pre-film days, seem to be the ones who most experienced moments of delighted recognition upon seeing him on the screen ("That's just how I pictured him, but even better!!!"). I am in the group that thought, "Never in a million years did I envision Frodo to look and be like this!!!! -- and I'm loving it!"

The matter of how men perceive Frodo, failing to see his attractiveness for women, or acting like they don't perceive it, is something I addressed in a very enjoyable email discussion with a K-D friend who is a strong Elijah Wood fan. We were discussing how fed-up we were with reading reviews subsequent to LotR that always referred EW as, a "hobbit," "Elfin," "fragile," and so forth. They seemed to be used to belittle him even while complimenting him. This led to a deeper discussion on the sometimes unsettling nature of film-Frodo's appeal.

I'm going to paste parts of two of the letters below, in a series of comment boxes. (I have not asked permission to post A,’s replies, I am afraid, so I will have to leave them out.


Sept. 28, to A:
I may put it in The Faculty one day, as a whim remark, but one of the things that struck me in reading all these recent reviews of GSH and EII is how often they throw in something about how little and cuuuuute he is. They don't say that; they usually say it negatively like, "former hobbit", "doe-eyed star of ....", "elfin actor....", "big trembling blue saucers for eyes...." etc.

What I think these comments really are saying is something like this (even if the writers don't know it, esp. if they are men and don't want to sound as if they have a "thing" for EW, which I don't think they generally do).... I think they throw this stuff in because they find him so intensely appealing when they meet him in person (again, I don't mean sexually, necessarily, but the way fans always talk about when they go all prickly over him), they are a little embarrassed or put-off by the power of their own response. So they toss in back-handed compliments, by saying something slightly dismissive about his looks (for those comments really are about his looks more than anything else). But I think what they really are trying to dismiss is not his looks, but the effect those looks have on them. Just a hunch.

One interviewer said that to look at EW was to want to pick him up and protect him. (Well, we all know about that!) No one says that about Dustin Hoffman or Al Pacino, now, do they? EW's special appeal has a great deal to do with his looks, I am sure, speaking as a fan. He is beautiful the way children, fawns, puppies and the aliens who come out of the ship at the end of Close Encounters are beautiful. Some people call it, "magical," or, "otherworldly," or ,"uncanny," or, just "cuuuuuute" -- but it has to do with his very diminutiveness, not just his fabulous eyes and face. If he looked exactly the same as he does, but was half a foot taller, I don't think he'd provoke quite the same response. (He might get more parts, though, except not Frodo - whaaah!) But when people meet him -- adults -- an awful lot of them feel powerfully drawn to him, drawn to him as someone they want to pick up and squeeze (or fondle), and they don't want others to see that. Not if they are men, anyway.


To A., 10-02-05:

A, you wrote:

I will hazard to say that there easily could have been quite a number of straight men out there who had an uncomfortable attraction to Frodo. Then they get all gruff and dismissive--to show their indifference.

I wouldn't at all be surprised.


(….cont’d…)



Mechtild
mechtild at 2005-11-18 19:04 (UTC) (Link)

"Possible uneasiness," pt. 2

(…cont’d from previous post…)

I think it's not just that they are straight and responding to a man. Otherwise they would feel more odd remarking how handsome Orlie was as Legolas. Even my macho brother was able to see that Orlando was very handsome and very attractive. When guessing whom it was I secretly liked in the LotR films, his first guess was, "the Elf -- the blond killing machine -- right???"

I think straight men can usually see the attraction in an Orlando or a Sean Bean (or any of the other "manly men"). They usually are not threatened to know they can see it. Maybe they even feel a little something of it themselves (being attracted to another man), which they may not approve of in themselves, but they don't seem worry about it that much, unless they are very straight-laced -- thinking, "Am I latent homo?????!!!!!????"

But when a fully grown-up straight man feels things for Frodo/EW, I think he worries about it the same way the fully grown-up women often do .... He feels the shadow of "paedophilia" lurking somewhere in there (which most consider far worse than garden-variety homosexual feelings, after all.) Some of EW/Frodo's fans -- male and female -- do feel very comfortable about feeling a strong affection towards him. I think (per the recent discussion in The Faculty) that Peter Jackson would be one of those. They, like him, feel a strong affection for him (EW), but a purely parental one. Others (and I would say this includes most of his male cast-mates like Dom or Sean, with whom EW is usually portrayed as having a sexualized relationship, but which I don't believe in) feel a strong affection for him that is "brotherly," or, even "little-brotherly." But still others feel an affection for him that really is muddied by sexual feelings (*raises hand*).

I think that for older men and women, the issue of having sexualized feelings for a child or teenager is touched on in this. They may have no sexual designs on him at all, really, but the mere fact that they feel physical affection towards him -- that they would like to cuddle or hold him or "pet" him -- makes them feel extremely uneasy, as if this affection were a sign that they were closet child-molesters. This may be true in some instances. But, more often, I think this nearly-paranoid feeling is probably the result of our cultural conditioning: our culture is hyper-vigilant about child-molestation -- and litigates it heavily -- so that anyone who feels a desire to be physically affectionate towards a child or teen (or those who seem like children/teens), feels as though their normal urge might be deviant. Just guessing.

(I hope I didn't mess up any of the sequencing during this cut-and-paste process!)
taerie
taerie at 2005-11-18 20:18 (UTC) (Link)

Re: "Possible uneasiness," pt. 2

Interesting.
And I think valid for some guys. People are funky and easily disturbed when it comes to sexual identification. I always thought that some of the reviews I have seen seemed unfair. It has occurred to me to wonder why.. and wonder from whence it came. As you know, my focus is on Frodo.. but I blink sometimes and step out of Middle Earth briefly and admire EW for his astonishing talent. (How does he DO that?) is usually the thought when he pulls something off with apparent ease that no amount of makeup, lighting or script help could have accomplished.
I really believe that at his young age he has done some of the greatest acting I have ever seen. And at MY age I have seen quite a bit. I feel so lucky that he played my Frodo.. so of course, I too get a bit snarly when I see some things written.
I have to also admit that it really did occur to me that book Frodo was sexy years ago.. in addition to just reacting to him as an especially beloved character. I wasn't alone in this. I was joined in my yearly Frodo feast in September by friends who fantasized about him. I can only imagine what they think of him now. Film Frodo definitely exacerbated this.
(I am going to tell my husband that you think he is a perv cause he DOESN'T think Frodo is handsome. Or that you think that HE thinks he is a perv cause he secretly DOES. Hahahahah! Just joking.)
Mechtild
mechtild at 2005-11-18 21:22 (UTC) (Link)

Re: "Possible uneasiness," pt. 2

(I am going to tell my husband that you think he is a perv cause he DOESN'T think Frodo is handsome. Or that you think that HE thinks he is a perv cause he secretly DOES. Hahahahah! Just joking.)

Oh, don't tell him THAT, LOL! After all, there even are women *gasp* who don't think Frodo's looks are any great shakes. "Funny-looking." "Pop-eyed." But far more I have heard women, older women like me especially, swooning dreadfully over him, especially over how breathtakingly beautiful he is, like a doll in a box. And I also hear an awful lot of ambivalence in that swooning. "I know he is old enough to be my son, but...." "I know he's just a kid, but...." "I know I am too old to feel this way, but...."

If they were 30- 40- 50- year-old men swooning for a 18-21-year-old actress, they woudld think themselves perfectly justified in their response. The older ones might feel a little foolish ("as if she'd like an old git like me!"), but they wouldn't feel sort of pervy the way so many of film Frodo and EW's fans do.

I did have to wonder, though, at all those articles in which the writer seemed to feel compelled to remark on EW's appearance in a way that recognized its power, while at the same time putting it down a little. "Yeah, I can see he's an adorable, amazing looking little guy. Who wouldn't want to pinch those rosy cheeks? But, hey! I'm immune to that sort of thing. And I've got pets at home to cuddle and squeeze if I feel an, "oh, isn't he the cutest thing!" attack coming on."
taerie
taerie at 2005-11-18 22:40 (UTC) (Link)

Re: "Possible uneasiness," pt. 2

>an awful lot of ambivalence in that swooning. "I know he is old enough to be my son, but...." "I know he's just a kid, but...." "I know I am too old to feel this way, but...."

If they were 30- 40- 50- year-old men swooning for a 18-21-year-old actress, they woudld think themselves perfectly justified in their response. The older ones might feel a little foolish ("as if she'd like an old git like me!"), but they wouldn't feel sort of pervy the way so many of film Frodo and EW's fans do.>>>

I wonder why that is. Even I, as shameless as I am have paused to wonder if I OUGHT to apologize to somebody for it. Stupid, really.
I have said before that sometimes I don't know whether to feed or snog Frodo.. ( Snogging usually wins.)As you said though.. He's a hobbit so you can do both. The PERFECT male! LOL!

This all makes me think of a BBC television episode of "Father Ted." (A show that seems hilarious to me.) In it, his older housekeeper is crazy for a man on TV who purposely excites the mother instinct of his audience. Hordes of middle aged and older women find out that she has won a personal visit by him and they converge on the house in a parody of the Night of the Living Dead movies wanting to feed him cake and knit him sweaters.:-)
Mechtild
mechtild at 2005-11-18 22:53 (UTC) (Link)

Re: "Possible uneasiness," pt. 2

I wonder why that is. Even I, as shameless as I am have paused to wonder if I OUGHT to apologize to somebody for it. Stupid, really.

If you had hung around on messageboards more (focussed on Frodo/EW), you would have heard A LOT of apologizing. I could understand the impulse, having had it myself, but, really, I have come to accept the fact that desire and love know no age limits. What does have a limit is acting on that desire and love. In the film "American Beauty," the protagonist, a man in his forties, has a huge idealized crush on his teenaged daughter's best friend. Is it weird or abnormal that he should feel this way? I don't think so, personally. But would it be terribly unwise, even tragic (not to mention illegal) for him to act on it? Yes. But the desire itself seems within the range of "normal" to me, even though it cannot be satisfied.

This all makes me think of a BBC television episode of "Father Ted." (A show that seems hilarious to me.) In it, his older housekeeper is crazy for a man on TV who purposely excites the mother instinct of his audience. Hordes of middle aged and older women find out that she has won a personal visit by him and they converge on the house in a parody of the Night of the Living Dead movies wanting to feed him cake and knit him sweaters.:-)

Oh, I have never heard of this "Father Ted" series. What a hilarious premise! It sounds like 50% of Frodo/EW fandom; me, I want to feed him, but I'll skip the sweater-knitting. On with the petting and cuddling and stroking!
(Anonymous) at 2005-11-17 15:34 (UTC) (Link)
That was interesting Mechtild,

I can see how one can fall in love with one’s own creation. There is the tendency to build up a person’s character (read a film star), in your imagination, and if/when you meet that person in real life it can be one great disappointment.

It’s like Garfield says “It’s not the having It’s the getting” :D

I believe Shakespeare said something on those lines: Whosoever having been granted their wish is satisfied (?) or something like that.


Quote:

Ah, but Estë, he isn't that beautiful in real life. (EW) Only in film-Frodo life is EW that beautiful.

Ooops! I must learn to be more explicit :)

I know that he is not that beautiful in RL, I meant that if EW, looked that beautiful naturally; without the make-up, lighting, and wig there could be a negative side.


Estë
Mechtild
mechtild at 2005-11-17 17:36 (UTC) (Link)

(Long reply; sorry!)

There is the tendency to build up a person’s character (read a film star), in your imagination, and if/when you meet that person in real life it can be one great disappointment. (…) I know that he is not that beautiful in RL, I meant that if EW, looked that beautiful naturally; without the make-up, lighting, and wig there could be a negative side.

From what I can see on his fan sites and on the EW-centric LJ’s, EW in fact does experience that “negative side” of being though beautiful, LOL. I do think his fans exaggerate the things they see in him that they associate with the Frodo he created. Still, I tend not to give EW enough credit. It is not as though his Frodo portrayal was pasted on, something totally alien to him. From what others around him have said and from his own words and “aura”, it seems that his film-Frodo projected and amplified qualities he already had.
Mechtild
mechtild at 2005-11-17 17:47 (UTC) (Link)

"Long Reply" pt. 2

I can see how one can fall in love with one’s own creation.

I wanted to be clear, Estë, that I didn’t mean that we Frodo lovers “created” our love for him, in that we fully-fashioned him in our minds as we watched the films. I guess I wanted to say that his portrayal both answered long-cherished (if shadowy) notions of the lover we most desired, but also exceeded it.

I used my own personalized interpretation of “Pygmalion and Galatea” to illustrate, but I think it was more misleading than helpful. Sorry! *sheepish face* Usually, the myth is used to show how people fall in love with what they have created. That is a strong theme in Tolkien, too, in his stories about the Elves, especially (and in talking about himself, personally). But I wanted to use that myth to talk about how what is created transcends what was intended. I had always dreamed of some ideal lover (although I had forgotten about it for decades), but what I got was more than and different from what I had been dreaming of.

I think Pygmalion, as an artist, started in to create a statue of a beautiful woman, to please himself as an artist and hopefully his patron. If he were successful, he could look at his work with pride and satisfaction, “Great work, if I do say so myself! I hope it wins first place at the Athens Gala! I love it!” But, in the myth, Pygmalion not only loved “it” but “her” – the woman whose image emerged from the marble under his hands. Who was she? Yes, she would have to be an expression of what Pygmalion most deeply wanted. But, even then, I don’t think he would pine the way he did. I think the woman who emerged would have to have been more than, other than what he wanted. If she were only what he had wanted, he would have “accomplished” her; she still would have no life of her own. It’s the “gift” or “inspiration” part of art that allowed what emerged as he worked to be different than, other than, greater than whatever he consciously or subconsciously wished for. He could see that the person in his finished statue was not just his creation, but had a "life" of its own, which is necessary for having a relationship (i.e. fall in love). You can't have a relationship with what is wholly you own creation, you can only admire it.

I guess I am still mulling over why I have responded the way I have to film Frodo. I have had my crushes on men and famous artists over the years (though not in a long time), but nothing like this, and, on no one like him. In some ways, he’s a fulfilment of what I have always admired in men – such as his art-works-classical beauty and his noble character, kind nature, etc. But he is radically different from the types of men (real life or famous/fictional) I have been besotted with in the past. This swoon for Frodo really has taken me into a new world, and into a new self. It has shown a “me” to me that I hadn’t know was there! In that way, he could not possibly be my creation. His very power over my imagination arises from his ... otherness, his ... unexpectedness.

But why should I be so surprised? He came into my world to lead me into his: Faerie. Tolkien said it was a perilous realm where few go and leave unscathed. Some don’t leave at all.
frodos_mum
frodos_mum at 2007-03-11 14:28 (UTC) (Link)

Re: Frodo Baggins & Elijah Wood

As you can see, I have been having a lovely time roaming around your LJ.

I know that this is a long time after the fact, but I wanted to remark on this comment of yours:

"I do think his fans exaggerate the things they see in him that they associate with the Frodo he created. Still, I tend not to give EW enough credit. It is not as though his Frodo portrayal was pasted on, something totally alien to him. From what others around him have said and from his own words and “aura”, it seems that his film-Frodo projected and amplified qualities he already had."

First let me mention that I admit to being quietly interested in Elijah Wood and his post-Frodo career. However, my main focus always was, and still is, Frodo Baggins (as portrayed by EW).
Although I do not claim to know Elijah at all, I believe that he has some Frodo-ish characteristics which, as you say, have been amplified through his role in the film trilogy. His good nature and humility spring to mind for a start.
As to his physical Frodo similarities; his eyes, lips, and skin (oh, the skin...) have to be seen in the flesh to be believed.
His eyes are every bit as superb as film-lit, made-up Frodo's, and there's an interesting aspect to his skin in that it seems to be illuminated from within. (I swear I wasn't a complete Elijah-crazy nut when I observed these phenomena. Lol.)
I was so enchanted that I was able to overlook the short, very non-Frodo hair and moderately unattractive beard he sported at the time.

So, yes, because of his role as Frodo, some of EW's fans do exaggerate the things that they see in him, but haul it in a few notches, and much of it is very possibly true. ;-)

Mechtild
mechtild at 2007-03-11 17:52 (UTC) (Link)

Re: Frodo Baggins & Elijah Wood

You know, Frodo's Mum (Anne), I have reconsidered my position on how much viewers owe to EW for the way film-Frodo turned out -- apart from his [amazing] physical qualities.

Just a few days ago I was answering a comment from Mariole, mulling over why viewers would still like screen-Aragorn, even though the screenwriters had him do such un- and anti- Aragorn things (Mariole Hated screen-Aragorn). I decided it was because qualities that were in Viggo Mortensen himself, offscreen, came through in spite of what Aragorn did in the film, winning audiences anyway. Why paraphrase. I'll find the comment and quote part of it here (posted 3/10/07, in Lothlorien Pt. 2, my emphases added):

Film Aragorn does those things you listed, and more. As for me, I can't get over the fact that the writers had him lop off the head of an official emissary -- something only the baddest of Bad Guys do.

What film-Aragorn conveys that makes me warm to him so is a sense of humanity, a sense you don't have of him, I can see. When I try to discover where it comes from, it must come from the actor himself. Film-Faramir, too, was made to do some terrible, very un-Faramir-like things in the film. Yet simply because David Wenham was playing the role, I nevertheless got the impression film-Faramir was an extremely good, decent, likeable, if not loveable man.

How can that be? It's *got* to be something in these actors' manner or way of being, in themselves. How did Frodo manage to come off as though he had "steely strength" to so many (although not to all, certainly!) on screen, considering the amount of mental and bodily ineptitude he showed? Reflecting on it as I write to you, I think it's because Elijah Wood has that quality himself. It just came through, no matter what they had Frodo do. He's a person who keeps getting up and keeps going, a "plucky little fellow", no matter what. It wasn't the writing, it was the casting. Every fan talks about Frodo's magic, his gentleness. Those, too, I think come from EW himself. Really, Frodo is written as frequently pissy and prone to daft spells; generally neurotic, and often weak. But, with EW doing the role, it comes off as "magical" and "gentle".

So: no matter *what* the writers had Aragorn do, because Viggo Mortensen played the role, Aragorn came off as a decent man, a charismatic leader, and "a real human being". I think this came from the actor, evidenced by Viggo's own on-set qualities, where he was seen to be: a) admired and respected, as professionally talented and serious, b) a strong leader, whose "men" became unmistakeably devoted to him, c) generally empathetic and emotionally warm, yet reserved and private d) in spite of pranks, highly courteous in his day-to-day interactions with all, regardless of rank, and e) beloved of the actors who worked with him.

So, as you can see, I've changed my mind about EW's contribution to film-Frodo. I think it really was qualities innate to him as a person that made Frodo what he was onscreen. When I look only at Frodo's speeches and actions, it becomes clear that the character would have come off very differently -- and lesser -- if someone else had just played what was written. I think this all the more when I bear in mind EW never had read the book, and was not [therefore] informing his portrayal with a lot of positive stuff about Frodo that got left out of the script. It had to come from EW himself.
(Anonymous) at 2005-11-18 08:31 (UTC) (Link)
A great post Mechtild,

Quote

But why should I be so surprised? He came into my world to lead me into his: Faerie. Tolkien said it was a perilous realm where few go and leave unscathed. Some don’t leave at all. :)

End quote


I for one have not the slightest intention of leaving. It is a wonderful means of feeding the imagination.

Estë
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