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NF-Lee's Gildor and Frodo

New Frodo Manip: Ferdinand Heilbuth's "The Reader", plus jan-u-wine's 'Heir to the Dreamer'.

Posted on 2009.09.22 at 08:08
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~*~





Happy Birthday, Bilbo and Frodo!


Note: This is the second of this year's two birthday posts. For Jan's birthday poem from Primula's pov, click HERE.



I have long wanted to post jan-u-wine's Heir to the Dreamer, a poem in which Bilbo reaches his decision to adopt the younger Baggins. I know I keep saying, "this is one of my favourites", but this is one of my favourites. What better way to celebrate their birthdays than with a poem, one that holds up facets of both these beloved characters so beautifully?

There are no film scenes of Frodo as a child, and I've already presented all the early FotR scenes set in the Shire. Consequently, for the purposes of illustrating this poem, I felt compelled to make a new Frodo manip. My file of Frodo Art Travesty "possibles" has got very small, but there was one piece I thought might do. Although the picture was painted in the middle of the nineteenth century, it recalls art from an earlier era. It reminds me of Frodo manips I've already made from portraits of young men with books, such as those by Bronzino, Lotto and Metsu, but these were painted in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Heilbuth's chiaroscuro and rich but judicious use of colour give the painting a more venerable heritage, one worthy of film-Frodo's classic looks. I think the resulting image complements jan-u-wine's poem well.


~*~


The source painting:

I could not find that much about the painter, Ferdinand Heilbuth. He was born in Hamburg in 1826, where he lived until he left his studies to become a Rabbi and travelled to Dusseldorf, Rome and Paris with one of France’s most important artists, Gleyre. He stayed in France, becoming a citizen in 1876. He died in 1889.

His exhibited at the Royal Academy in London twice, and at the Grosvenor Gallery many times. He was voted and decorated into the Legion of Honor. Vincent Van Gogh admired his ability and wanted to join Heilbuth and another artist friend, Anthon Van Rappard, in Paris to paint together. (It isn't clear that this ever happened.) The few short entries I found said that Heilbuth was admired for his expressiveness and use of colour, and that he excelled as a portrait painter. He certainly knew how to paint Frodo!



The Reader, 1856, by Ferdinand Heilbuth:







The face:

The other element for the manip is, of course, film-Frodo's face. After a good deal of experimentation I chose the screencap below, which comes from the scene in Bree in FotR:















The Final Manip:

Below are two sizes of the manip, since people's computer screens are so varied in size. I really love the way it turned out. The colours and rendering and mood of the original painting are superb, but changing the faces dramatically changes the painting. In the original piece, a sweet-faced young man is pleasantly absorbed in what looks like interesting reading. Frodo is absorbed, but it's not clear if he's absorbed in what he's reading or merely staring at the page, thinking of something else. Perhaps it's the passage he just read, but maybe his thoughts have been prompted by the smell of leaves drifting in or the sound of a change in the wind.

As for me, I suppose as a film-fan, knowledge of the scene from which the face comes strongly influences the way I view the manip. Because I know that Frodo, in that moment, has just learned that Gandalf has not arrived in Bree, I can't help the roil of emotions Frodo is experiencing from crossing over into my impression of the final image. Other viewers will see other things. But I love how Frodo's face in the painting evokes so many possibilities.



Original size:


Photobucket







Enlarged:


Photobucket






Cropped, enlarged:


Photobucket









Heir to the Dreamer

~ by jan-u-wine

It cannot be nine years they are gone.

It cannot be the lad grows,
yet
grows no better.

It was Yule
when last I chanced
to see him,

Yule,
and the great Hall filled
with warmth and light...

chock-a-block
with feasting
and couples a-courting
in sweet-shadowed corners.

Bright brown brew,
and fresh-pressed cider,
mulled spicy-hot
from cook's vast black kettle,
wended pleasant down many
a throat.

I admit,

I had sampled more than a pint
or two
of honey-tipped ale
when I spied him.

If laughter were a Sea,
it were a Sea broken
and ended
by the silence of that shore.

I could not help but see
the quiet of my cousin's eyes,
mirrored in his own,
nor the grace
that bespoke the 'faerie wife'
in that odd-slender form.

It was that night I gave him his father's pipe.

From the hollowed tusk of a mighty
oliphaunt,
it was,
bound in Elven-flowered silver

And the lad took it,
and became more quiet, still.

A nail-bitten thumb
followed the curve of the stem,

touched the bowl as if to tamp down
what was there only in imagination.

He turned from me then,
looked past diamond windows,
blazened with warmth and light,
to that which lay beyond.

The River.

Silenced by winter's breath, it was,
grey and stone-still,
cold as…….

This will not do.

No, this assuredly will not do.

He will not know another winter here,
I promise myself,

he will not know another season of despair.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Spring 1389.

Beyond the window of my study,
old Hamfast and his youngest,
(too small as yet to work the garden,
but not to be denied)
turn soil beneath the cloud-milked Sun.

The boy's feet carry him, in their excitement,
to my door.

A small hand enfolds two grey spheres,
round as marbles,
delicate-veined and shining against dirt-smeared fist.

He is not so old yet as to know what these might be,
but his eyes, green as old-willow bark,
round with wonder
as the creatures unfold upon his palm.

This lad.

And the other.

They have decided me.

In the fall of this year,
when the harvest is called home
(and before ever the river falls to chill'd sleep)

I shall call Home a harvest of a different sort….

a harvest of youth-awkward limbs and lonely heart,
a harvest of sea-dreams and eyes bemused by stars….

He shall be my heir,
this Elf-strange lad who shares the day of my birth.

And I will teach him what he must needs know:

which crop is sown in spring,
and which must wait for summer's heat…

what river feeds which farmer's land….

the proper tang of proper leaf…..
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~

The gold nib of my pen meets parchment,
twines words of salutation to those of invitation.

He will come, I know it.

He will come,
and live beneath the green of the Hill,
and dream of the moon-silvered Sea
in the room that was his father's.

He will come.

I have decided.










~ First 2009 Birthday post: "Birth Day" by jan-u-wine, with detail from Bouguereau's 'The Young Gypsies'.






Other Tables of Links:


~ Frodo Art Travesty LJ entries (entries that present selected manips, which may feature notes on the paintings and manip techniques, as well as essays or poems).


~ Album of all Frodo Art Travesties (a gallery of images only—be sure to enlarge images after opening).


~ All entries featuring jan-u-wine's poems.



~ Mechtild

Comments:


Shirebound
shirebound at 2009-09-22 14:28 (UTC) (Link)
What a beautiful manip. And the poem is full of love and resolve and Bilbo's wisdom.
Mechtild
mechtild at 2009-09-22 16:11 (UTC) (Link)
Well, you know I agree with that assessment of the poem. And I'm really pleased with the way the manip came out. If I wrote more fiction, I'd write a story to go with it. :)
wakerobin at 2009-09-22 15:16 (UTC) (Link)
A thousand thank yous for all the love and inspiration. I sincerely hope some of your work has found its way to the lovely Mr. Wood's attention. It's such a joy to see his beauty appreciated. Also, as one who believes in reincarnation, I can't help but wonder which artist in which era was granted the blessing of having Elijah as a model and muse. Cause you know this have to have been - the gods would not be so unkind as to give Elijah to only one era....
Mechtild
mechtild at 2009-09-22 16:27 (UTC) (Link)
Gosh, thanks, Wakerobin! What a generous comment.

I have often wished Elijah Wood had seen this or that manip or discussion here of his portrayal of Frodo. Especially since I think he has played so many part since then that are lesser, both as characters and as acting roles, I have really hoped he knows how much fans have appreciated and thought about his work in the role. When it comes to his looks, I'm sure he's aware that lots of women think he's the cutest thing and a darling little hottie, but I'd love him to know there are also people who think he's not only cute and hot but has a face in a million, one that comes right out of the tradition of great art.

I can't help but wonder which artist in which era was granted the blessing of having Elijah as a model and muse.

I have always wished painters and sculptors of the past had been able to work with his film-Frodo as a model. He's got such a classic face. I guess my manips are a way of trying to realise that wish. :)
Королева Сахарных Пряников
kairwendis at 2009-09-22 16:16 (UTC) (Link)
Ooo! Beautiful!
Mechtild
mechtild at 2009-09-22 16:29 (UTC) (Link)
Thank you! I have to say I love your icon. It looks straight out of the Shire, and in an era of painting that really suits. Do you know what it comes from?

ETA: Doh! I went to your LJ and read the label for your icon, "Edelfeldt", found out about Inger Edelfeldt and saw it was a detail from her picture of "The Long Expected Party". You have introduced me to another good Tolkien illustrator. Thank you!

Edited at 2009-09-22 04:36 pm (UTC)
Королева Сахарных Пряников
kairwendis at 2009-09-22 17:15 (UTC) (Link)
This image is mine icon some years. :) I long considered a picture of Edelfeldt and have chosen this girl.

(I do not know English language and I translate the online translator. Likely, this text looks silly. Excuse. :-))
Mechtild
mechtild at 2009-09-22 19:15 (UTC) (Link)
You chose well! (And your English is just fine, especially to me, someone who can't get along in another language at all except to say, "where is the toilet"). :)
mews1945
mews1945 at 2009-09-22 18:39 (UTC) (Link)
Oh, Mechtild, I think that's one of your best manips. It's young Frodo, before he came to live with Bilbo, with the lostness and sorrow in his eyes. The poem is beautiful too, full of Bilbo's determination to bring Frodo home.
Mechtild
mechtild at 2009-09-22 19:19 (UTC) (Link)
Oh, Mews, thank you. I was pleased with it, too. The face and Heilbuth's painting do so much for each other. I love the way the elements come together. I think the final image is restrained enough to bear many interpretations, but, like you, I can't help seeing a foreknowledge or intuition of sadness and loss in his Frodo's face.

And, as I said, this is one of my favourite Jan poems, and perhaps my favourite of all her Bilbo pieces.
Lavender Took
lavendertook at 2009-09-22 18:48 (UTC) (Link)
That manip is perfect! A Hamlet-ed or brooding Goth!Frodo.(-: And a perfect fit for Jan's poem. I love Bilbo's "This will not do." And young sam "not to be denied."

Happy Baggins Birthday to you! I'm sooo sleepy from staying up late writing a birthday mathom--but a very good kind of tired I can handle now and then. How are the kitlets and their poor harassed elder statescat?
Mechtild
mechtild at 2009-09-22 19:24 (UTC) (Link)
Ha ha ha! "Goth Frodo"! Lavender, I will spit out my tea. I'm so glad you liked the poem and manip. When I have finished the chores and duties still left from the morning, I will start browsing the other birthday greetings.
Lavender Took
lavendertook at 2009-09-23 01:40 (UTC) (Link)
Gods, I'm so glad you "get" me, and know my play doesn't contradict that I think it's a great manip.:-D You know, Bingo used to have a goth icon--someone took the beautiful, brooding, downcast promo shot of Fro holding the ring on it's chain around his neck and gave him eyeliner and mascara--I'll have to find that one for you--its not loaded on his page anymore.

And I still want an update on the furry household members.(-:
Mechtild
mechtild at 2009-09-23 01:52 (UTC) (Link)
Oh, they're fine, Lavender. I didn't want to get in the habit of posting cat updates as a regular thing. The "kittens", Elsa and Charles, had their first birthdays in the last week in July, yet they are still pipsqueaks compared to the Big Guy (now), Angelo. They also still love to play most of their waking hours and are tremendously entertaining and endearing. Healthwise, Charles still has a chronic case of little blobs in the corners of his eye, and he still has a snuffly nose, but only a little and not all the time, unlike the way he was all the time before. He seems to have outgrown his state of having a perpetual nasal cold. Elsa is still a pip but also still has bad gingivitis. I have to brush her teeth and put in a rinse every day to keep it under control. Such frail creatures! Angelo also had a gum condition and had to get an expensive tooth cleaning and have another molar pulled at the end of the summer. I've been brushing and rinsing his teeth, too, but his gums look almost back to normal. After his bad molar went, he seemed to become a happier cat, too. So perhaps the tooth had been bothering him for months, but not badly enough to just lay on the floor and yowl. He's the affectionate, love-demanding guy he's always been and more. Still testy with the kittens when they really aggravate him, but awfully tolerant on the whole. And that's the cat news.
Estë   (or ST for short)
este_tangletoes at 2009-09-22 18:51 (UTC) (Link)
Thank you so much ladies.

I can hardly tear myself away from the beautiful manip.

He will not know another winter here,
I promise myself,

he will not know another season of
despair.


*Hugs Bilbo tight*

--Estë





Mechtild
mechtild at 2009-09-22 19:22 (UTC) (Link)
Oh, thank you, Estë. It's a beautiful, deeply sympathetic portrayal of Bilbo. I feel I clearly see the hobbit who cared enough to dare much to reconcile the warring parties in the end of The Hobbit. I love him and the poem makes me love him all the more.
Prim
primula_baggins at 2009-09-23 03:10 (UTC) (Link)
'It was that night I gave him his father's pipe.
...
And the lad took it,
and became more quiet, still.

A nail-bitten thumb
followed the curve of the stem,

touched the bowl as if to tamp down
what was there only in imagination.

He turned from me then,
looked past diamond windows,
blazened with warmth and light,
to that which lay beyond.

The River.'

*sniff* Makes me want to cuddle the dear boy. :(

------------------------------------------

'and dream of the moon-silvered Sea
in the room that was his father's.'

I love the thought of Frodo staying in the same room as his father's.

The poem is equal to the manip in beauty. Thanks to you both!

Edited at 2009-09-23 03:11 am (UTC)
Mechtild
mechtild at 2009-09-23 03:19 (UTC) (Link)
Aw, Primula, thanks for such a beautiful, reflective comment. I appreciate it so much.
aredhelebenesse
aredhelebenesse at 2009-09-23 05:51 (UTC) (Link)
Somehow I've missed this last night. Well, it was late ... aham ...

That's an especially beautiful manip, Mechtild. I can see Frodo's eyes fly over the lines in the book. He's so in thoughts.
And this poem brings the reader into the same state of thinking. It makes the thoughts wander and fly away over hills and rivers directly into the shire's heart. So beautiful!
Mechtild
mechtild at 2009-09-23 13:26 (UTC) (Link)
Thanks for your lovely comment, Aredhelebenesse. Yes, the poem does sort of take the reader away with it, into the thoughtful perceptions of Bilbo, and his world.
Illyria
illyria_novia at 2009-09-23 11:38 (UTC) (Link)
I shall call Home a harvest of a different sort….

a harvest of youth-awkward limbs and lonely heart,
a harvest of sea-dreams and eyes bemused by stars….

He shall be my heir,
this Elf-strange lad who shares the day of my birth.

And I will teach him what he must needs know:

which crop is sown in spring,
and which must wait for summer's heat…

what river feeds which farmer's land….

the proper tang of proper leaf…..


However does she do it? This is so, so beautiful. It has Bilbo's dreamy maundering tone in it, his poetic inclination, and his decisiveness. This is just gorgeous! Thank Jan-u-wine for me, will you please, Mechtild?

And what can I say about your manip that other commenters hadn't said. As always I am in awe of your skillful blending of the original painting and the film image. The end result looks as though it was the original painting, while Heilbuth's is the travesty, so balanced and even the composition and texture. Ah, for Elijah to wear something like this in the movies. I can't help but notice that the tunic emphasizes the strength, straightness, and shapeliness of his hands. :D

Thank you again, Mechtild, for another wondrous art travesty. I do hope that you will find more classic paintings to be "uplifted" for our edification. :D
Mechtild
mechtild at 2009-09-23 13:38 (UTC) (Link)
Gosh, what a heart-swelling reply, Illyria.

However does she do it? This is so, so beautiful. It has Bilbo's dreamy maundering tone in it, his poetic inclination, and his decisiveness.

Oh, that's wonderfully observed. As they say around here, "that's right on the money". Yes, I will point Jan to your comment.

And thanks for the praise and appreciation of Frodo transposed into Heilbuth's painting. I do love the way paintings are changed when the face is changed. It's almost an illustration in itself how powerful and transforming human expression can be. How it can be nearly literally true when someone says of a recent meeting, "even in that dank cell, when she smiled, it seemed the sun came out", or, conversely, "when he looked away, the room grew cold". The expression of the person observed has a tremendous effect on the way his or her whole surroundings are perceived. Naturually, since film Frodo has a face and expressiveness given by the art/film/literature gods, the effect of his face is especially powerful. :)

Edited at 2009-09-23 01:39 pm (UTC)
alyrthia
alyrthia at 2009-09-23 15:40 (UTC) (Link)
Fabulous, gorgeous, beautiful...and breathtaking manip.

Poem, very very lovely.

Thanks to you both
Mechtild
mechtild at 2009-09-23 16:28 (UTC) (Link)
You're welcome, Alyon. I hope you are well, in spite of rocky seas for the nation and the health care reform.
melyanna_65
melyanna_65 at 2009-09-24 21:11 (UTC) (Link)
I always enjoy your Frodo's manips, they're so artistic and perfect. Thanks for another great post on this special day!

*hugs*
Mechtild
mechtild at 2009-09-24 21:39 (UTC) (Link)
Thank you, Melyanna. Sometimes when I make manips I think of my friends on line like you who live in countries with fabulous collections of art from eras I love. To think of all the Frodo manip possibilities!!!! :)
Scarlet
stillscarlet at 2009-09-25 06:18 (UTC) (Link)
Mechtild, you've outdone yourself - what a fabulous manip! It is now gracing my monitor as a desktop wallpaper. Thank you! :)
Mechtild
mechtild at 2009-09-25 13:36 (UTC) (Link)
On your desktop? Oh, la la! I'll have to try it and see what it looks like! I'm using Alan Lee's meeting of Frodo and Gildor right now.

(Anonymous) at 2009-09-27 14:21 (UTC) (Link)
Both your manip and Jan's poem are exquisite, Mechtild. You have a great talent for choosing just the right screencap for a particular painting, and your ability to combine the two so seamlessly is admirable. It's marvelous how, taken out of the context of the film, Frodo's expression may be interpreted altogether differently.

'Frodo is absorbed, but it's not clear if he's absorbed in what he's reading or merely staring at the page, thinking of something else. Perhaps it's the passage he just read, but maybe his thoughts have been prompted by the smell of leaves drifting in or the sound of a change in the wind.'

To me he really looks as though he is 'off with the fairies.' (Or ‘faeries.’) What an enigmatic air there is about him, and one cannot help but wonder whether it was the book or some other distraction that inspired his reverie.

If laughter were a Sea,
it were a Sea broken
and ended
by the silence of that shore.

I could not help but see
the quiet of my cousin's eyes,
mirrored in his own,
nor the grace
that bespoke the 'faerie wife'
in that odd-slender form.

Jan’s poetry is both elegant and compelling. One might imagine she had travelled to Middle-earth, inhabited that world and known its people. How else does she ‘get’ them so perfectly? This poem makes me love Bilbo all the more.

Thank you both for this beautiful entry.


Mechtild
mechtild at 2009-09-29 23:34 (UTC) (Link)
I love what you wrote about Jan's poetry. It *does* seem as though she's been to Middle-earth to acquire this degree of familiarity with its world and its people.

Sorry I'm so long answering: I'm out of town for a while but have borrowed a computer for the moment. :)
(Anonymous) at 2009-10-01 19:04 (UTC) (Link)
Mechtild, I would forget my head if it were loose! The 'anonymous' comment was from me, Blossom. Thanks again.

~ Blossom.
telstar109
telstar_gold at 2009-09-27 23:47 (UTC) (Link)
Your manip is a real improvement on the original, IMO! Not just because it's Frodo's face, but because the particular shot you've chosen transforms the whole picture into a really arresting image. He's so lost in his thoughts, and they're obviously not happy ones.

Jan's poem, as always, is so incredibly visual. It's almost like watching a scene rather than reading it. These lines are so powerful and true:
If laughter were a Sea,
it were a Sea broken
and ended
by the silence of that shore.

Just brilliant.

The second part of the poem seemed familiar - have you posted it before?

Thanks to you both for these beauties!
Mechtild
mechtild at 2009-09-29 23:39 (UTC) (Link)
Hi! I'm sorry I'm late replying but I'm out of town without I computer. I have borrowed this one for a moment to check my mail. I'm so pleased you liked this manip and this poem, Telstar. I love this poem of Jan's, that's for sure. No, I've not posted this poem in full or in part before, but I have posted other Bilbo poems in which he musing upon young Frodo, and I think one does include Bilbo thinking about adopting Frodo. Maybe that's why it seems familiar. :)
(Anonymous) at 2009-10-01 21:25 (UTC) (Link)

Wondrous fair art and poetry

Dear Mechtild (well-Met!) and jan-u-wine --

One of the most beautiful Frodo art manips I have ever seen, and they have all been beautiful, so, that's saying a lot!! Goodness, you have gone to a lot of trouble, searching out the best paintings for this sort of thing. And matching Frodo to them perfectly. I do love the colors, they are so deep, and also loved reading about the original artist. I love learning new things! And I almost worship Van Gogh(forgive me, Lord), who was mentioned as well! :)
It is clear (to me, at least!) that Frodo is pondering something he has just read, and is starting to daydream. No one does it as well as he does,

and we know that from jan's poems!

It is a wonderful poem for the double-bday. Sad on the one hand, to be sure, but ending much more happily, and I confess I need happy endings, or, something close to happy, at least.

"Bright brown brew" -- the talk of the cider. It made me almost willing to drink some. I am not fond of any 'brew', as it were, but those words made me smile, and I know so many lovely people (and people I love) who DO love a good pint of (really fine, thick) brew that it makes me feel a little more like I understand their love and affection for it. Words are very strong things, wielded by the right people. (((jan)))

I could feel the tugging at Bilbo's heart toward both Samwise and Frodo.
Well done, well done! Thank you. I am sorry this comment is so late!
I see that Mech is in Calif. I trust Smeagol (sorry, no diacritic there) did not lead her astray. Argh!!

One more interesting effect of the art-plus-poetry is that when the poem is placed on the parchment-colored backing, which is then framed by the lovely green-yellow-rust (lost of shades)flowering/plants motif of the blog, it creates a sort of oasis for both the art and the poems. Of course I am sure Mech was/is well aware of this! But it's the first time I
have noticed how it can affect the reader.
It is so peaceful, so calm and lovely, that for quite a while, I forgot I was on the web. I was pulled into a very lovely, quiet world, and the poem
cements that feeling of how very SLOWLY they lived, compared to us, today.

'SLOWLY' was not meant as an sort of slight. On the contrary, it is much to be desired. They knew how to live, in the old days. Food, friends, family, drink, sky, sea, clouds, forest, candles, the hearth... nature. Going to bed when it got dark and getting up when the sun rose. Reading-- they had books and reading. And pipes (I can't relate, but it makes them happy, so, I'm happy for them! lol) ! I nearly forgot. But truly, they knew how to live. And so did folk in our world, as recently as about 200 years ago. Farming, the seasons, harvest, fresh fruit in summer, no industrial revolutions, not very much hustle and bustle at all.

The silence, when the crickets and so forth were not singing at night, and the animals were quiet, during a hot afternoon, must have been staggering. My tinnitus gets louder right now, just thinking about it. (no kidding!) But the silence would be so complete and full and wonderful.
I am sure they must have rushed about, now and then, given reason, in those days. But the operative part is that they were given good reason to rush about, and we rush about a LOT, often for not very good reasons. Our lives are so fast! It doesn't need to be that way, but it is, and here we are.

I don't want to end the post on a sad note, because the art and poem are so beautiful, and sadness would pull away from the beauty. So I'll go back to the theme of how lovely the art is and how evocative and true the poem is, and thank you both for taking me to another place entirely, far from our fast world. I needed to rest and slow down, and I did.

Thank you both, so much. And safe travels to Mech (Met), God speed.
Mary

Mechtild
mechtild at 2009-10-12 14:01 (UTC) (Link)

Re: Wondrous fair art and poetry

I am back, Mary. What a wonderful, thoughtful and thought-provoking reply. Don't worry you've left on a sad note. There is always sadness mixed into the beauty of LotR, which is one of its signatures.

I responded to a lot of the same things you did in Jan's poem, even the charm of "bright brown brew", which is immeasurably more appealing and evocative of something good to drink than "beer" or "ale" or "cider". I love the way you sensed the sounds but also the silence (I have tinnitus too, and dearly miss being able to hear it).

Special to your comment, I want to tell you how pleased I am to hear that you felt the visual presentation: the parchment coloured page and the background panels: added to your appreciation of the poem, that it enhanced your reading the way it did. I think the way text is presented influences the feel of the reading a lot, although for action packed page-turners, I guess any format would do. I spent along time choosing the look of this LJ, back when I did it, purposely to make it Shire-ish (accent on growing things), Bag End-ish (genteel, tasteful) and inviting a contemplative mood for looking at the images and reading the texts. I LOVE that you commented on it.

Smooches,

Mechtild
(Anonymous) at 2009-10-13 11:22 (UTC) (Link)

Re: Wondrous fair art and poetry

Smooches back! :) Mary
frodosweetstuff
frodosweetstuff at 2009-10-02 12:12 (UTC) (Link)
Oh gosh, that pic is lovely and heartbreaking. Poor Frodo looking so sad and thoughtful. I hope Sam will turn up with some flowers and some delicious foodstuff to cheer him up and bring a smile back onto his face.

Excellent manip - such a great pic and you chose the perfect face for it!!!! Thank you for sharing!
Mechtild
mechtild at 2009-10-12 13:51 (UTC) (Link)
Hi, I'm back from two weeks away, Frodosweetstuff, and just beginning to open the mail. Thanks for commenting!
julchen11
julchen11 at 2009-12-21 23:42 (UTC) (Link)
Wow! I always loved Heilbuth’s paintings especially this one (I got myself a poster years ago).
Your manip! I don’t know what to say. It seems Frodo reads but does he read at all? To me it looks like he’s lost in the words he has already read and now he’s lost in thoughts about them.
Daydreaming. So soft and so beautiful. This manip is a killer, mechtild. I burned it on CD and will get a poster next week. I’m sure it will look great.

Jan’s poem nearly killed me as well. I read it I don’t know how many times and I started daydreaming as well. Of course I printed this too and finished the calligraphy today. I’ll send a copy to both of you if you don’t mind.

“I shall call Home a harvest of a different sort….

a harvest of youth-awkward limbs and lonely heart,
a harvest of sea-dreams and eyes bemused by stars….

He shall be my heir,
this Elf-strange lad who shares the day of my birth.”

and

“He will come,
and live beneath the green of the Hill,
and dream of the moon-silvered Sea
in the room that was his father's.”

I only marked two of the most beautiful parts I ever read (and that says something).
It’s so sad in the beginning and so full of hope in the end. It shows how very touched Bilbo is by Frodo and little Sam . I’m still too moved to leave a proper comment but you both can be sure – after this it’s impossible to read any other post.

Thanks a lot, my friends. You both are simply amazing.

Love,
Julchen
Mechtild
mechtild at 2009-12-22 00:20 (UTC) (Link)
Goodness, Julchen, your comment melts me! I am so glad you saw this. "Heir to the Dreamer" has been one of my favourite Jan poems for years, but I had no image to pair with it. I suppose the time was right. Isn't it fabulously beautiful? She so inhabits her characters, giving them voice, mind-voices, heart-voices, soul-voices. I'll tell her you commented here.
jan_u_wine
jan_u_wine at 2009-12-23 03:37 (UTC) (Link)
My dear Jude....I want to tell you a little secret about how this poem came to be. I've loved what we call "pill-bugs" all of my life...those are those strange, grey, armoured little insects that roll themselves up into a ball when they feel threatened. I suppose they likely have been around longer than (ugh) roaches.

Anyway, I got to thinking about them one day, and I thought, "I bet little Sam would have loved them". From there, I could imagine Sam showing them to Bilbo, from whom he'd heard magical stories (and who'd surely appreciate magical creatures).

So, oddly enough, the genesis of this poem about Bilbo's decision to take Frodo away from the sadness that must surely have weighted him in Buckland was little Samwise.

Even if these poems are my own, there are ones that I consider more beautiful than others, ones where I remember the experience of writing with special fondness. This is one of *those*. It is exceedingly wonderful to be allowed to write within this universe.

thank you again, dear Jude.

~jan

ps: did you get the email I sent you last week?
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