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NF-Lee's Gildor and Frodo

Rivendell 15 ~ Bilbo’s Gifts IV: Bilbo’s remorse, plus jan-u-wine's Rivendell Suite Pt. 8.

Posted on 2009.03.03 at 10:51
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~*~



This is the last of the Rivendell series. Well, not the very last, in terms of the overall film: I did post a set of caps for the EE scene of the departure from Imladris two years ago (see link at bottom of page). But this is the last entry in the current series.

For this post, I just want to say how much I love the book excerpt quoted below. Bilbo is deeply moved, but waves off Frodo's heartfelt thanks with a laugh and a dose of his hearty manner, changing the subject. But as if he's wandered into yet another tender area, he breaks off, looks out the window and sings a little song. "He always used to joke about serious things," Frodo observed to Gandalf seventeen years earlier. It is like Bilbo to deflect open emotionalism with a bluff manner and a bit of humour. It is not only like Bilbo, it is like most hobbits. As Merry explained to Aragorn in the Houses of Healing, "it is the way of my people, to use light words at such times and say less than they mean. We fear to say too much. It robs us of the right words when a jest is out of place."

But the song Bilbo chooses to sing is very apt for the occasion, and I have always wondered if he was supposed to have made it up on the spot, or if it was something he'd sung for years and pulled out to express his feelings at that moment. It is pensive, and threaded with wistful yearning, but obliquely expressed, with a light tone and a modest, homely style. Either way, I am sure its meaning and the sentiment behind it was not lost on Frodo.

In addition to the caps, book and film scenes, I am privileged to feature the last poem in the Rivendell Suite. This final installment in the cycle first reflects Bilbo's point of view, then Frodo's. While jan-u-wine has written here to the film scene, she lets the more deeply developed relationship in the book shine through.



~*~




Book scene: from The Ring Goes South.


[Bilbo has just presented Frodo with Sting and the mithril shirt, along with some good advice.]

‘I cannot thank you as I should, Bilbo, for this, and for all your past kindnesses,’ said Frodo.

‘Don’t try!’ said the old hobbit, turning round and slapping him on the back. ‘Ow!’ he cried. ‘You are too hard now to slap! But there you are: Hobbits must stick together, and especially Bagginses. All I ask in return is: take as much care of yourself as you can, and bring back all the news you can, and any old songs and tales you can come by. I’ll do my best to finish my book before you return. I should like to write the second book, if I am spared.’ He broke off and turned to the window again, singing softly.

I sit beside the fire and think
of all that I have seen,
of meadow-flowers and butterflies
in summers that have been;

of yellow leaves and gossamer
in autumns that there were,
with morning mist and silver sun
and wind upon my hair.

I sit beside the fire and think
of how the world will be
when winter comes without a spring
that I shall ever see.

For still there are so many things
that I have never seen:
in every wood in every spring
there is a different green.

I sit beside the fire and think
of people long ago,
and people who will see a world
that I shall never know.

But all the while I sit and think
of times there were before,
I listen for returning feet
and voices at the door.

It was a cold grey day near the end of December. The East Wind was streaming through the bare branches of the trees, and seething in the dark pines on the hills. Ragged clouds were hurrying overhead, dark and low. As the cheerless shadows of the early evening began to fall the Company made ready to set out. They were to start at dusk, for Elrond counselled them to journey under cover of night as often as they could, until they were far from Rivendell.

[Description follows of the Fellowship in readiness to leave.]

Their farewells had been said in the great hall by the fire, and they were only waiting now for Gandalf, who had not yet come out of the house. A gleam of firelight came from the open doors, and soft lights were glowing in many windows. Bilbo huddled in a cloak stood silent on the doorstep beside Frodo. Aragorn sat with his head bowed to his knees; only Elrond knew fully what this hour meant to him. The others could be seen as grey shapes in the darkness.

Sam was standing by the pony, sucking his teeth, and staring moodily into the gloom where the river roared stonily below; his desire for adventure was at its lowest ebb.

‘Bill, my lad,’ he said, ‘you oughtn’t to have took up with us. You could have stayed here and et the best hay till the new grass comes.’ Bill swished his tail and said nothing.


~*~



Film scene:


[Bilbo comes to his senses, shocked and grieved as what he has done dawns on him. He glances at Frodo remorsefully.]

Bilbo: I'm sorry I brought this upon you, my boy! I'm sorry that you must carry this burden....

[Turning away, Bilbo sits heavily on the bed.]

Bilbo: I’m sorry for everything!

[Bilbo weeps. Coming up behind him, Frodo puts a comforting hand on Bilbo’s shoulder. Bilbo clasps it and presses it to his cheek.]
















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Rivendell Suite 8

~ by jan-u-wine


How well I remember
when he was

but
a lad.

How

he loved
all
the small and simple

vestments of the world,

how

he would stand,
amazed,

at the enchanted
winking

of a star,
or

still his breath,

in favour
of the linnet's
sweet song.

Oh, my lad.

It is no longer
given me

to hold you fast
against

all that dwells within
the shadow'd night,

nor
even

from that which yet
lives

beneath the Sun's golden
circle.


Within
*that* circle,

dying,
like this day,

It
glints,

lying close about your throat,

like the thief
It is.


Remember that, my lad:

It
is the thief,
the lie-monger,

the remover
of life.

Remember
this

moment,

when I have changed
before
your eyes,

and you,

forever,
before mine.


Remember *me*,
my son-who-never-was,

my lad-that-should-have-been.

Give me your hand,


Promise
we shall

say
"fare well"

in tomorrow's grey dawn
and not

farewell.

Say that you
forgive

me.






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Never should I begin
to repay

the indebtedness
of my heart

or know,
even,

the reckoning
of so large

a bond.

These well may be
our

last moments
together.

And he bows his head,
(Uncle),

who has always been so
proud,

he
bows his head,

(cousin)

and begs my forgiveness.

With all my heart,
cousin,

uncle,

*friend*.

With all my heart.

Namárië.

Fare well.













Previous entry:

Photobucket ~ Riv. 14: Bilbo’s Gifts 3 – Bilbo’s transformation, plus jan-u-wine's Rivendell Pt. 7.

Related entry:
~ Riv. 16: Farewell to Rivendell – caps from the widescreen EE version (posted Feb 9, 2007).

Other Links:

~ Entries with jan-u-wine's poems.


~ Main table for all entries


~ Mechtild

Comments:


Shirebound
shirebound at 2009-03-03 17:48 (UTC) (Link)
I sit beside the fire and think
of how the world will be
when winter comes without a spring
that I shall ever see.


I can never read those lines without getting chills. So poignant!
Mechtild
mechtild at 2009-03-03 19:44 (UTC) (Link)
Me, too.
(Deleted comment)
Mechtild
mechtild at 2009-03-03 19:46 (UTC) (Link)
Yes, it's a beautifully done scene. But knowing the book scene makes it even more moving for me, because I can't help all that material coming to mind when I watch them together. I wish there had been more of Ian Holm in the films. If I could turn the clock back he would definitely be my first choice to play Bilbo in the upcoming films. :)
aredhelebenesse
aredhelebenesse at 2009-03-03 21:31 (UTC) (Link)
It hurts to imagine their mood. To know you will maybe never meet again, but you ought not to give up your hope, for this would smooth the way for bad luck and desperation. Also I can almost feel the cold air by reading the scene in the book about the cold and gloomy atmosphere outside when they can see burning fires and soft golden lights in the house. I will ever be glad not to be forced to swap place and situation with them, nor to be a part of their fellowship.
And again Jan's poem touched me very deeply! I always need a tissue when I read her works.
Mechtild
mechtild at 2009-03-03 22:32 (UTC) (Link)
Also I can almost feel the cold air by reading the scene in the book about the cold and gloomy atmosphere outside when they can see burning fires and soft golden lights in the house. I will ever be glad not to be forced to swap place and situation with them, nor to be a part of their fellowship.

That's so well observed, Aredhelebenesse. It's true: it's cold and dark, night falling, when the Fellowship prepare to leave. How they all must long, with a deep longing, to stay there in Rivendell, in the light, in the warmth, in a safe truly *civilized* place. Instead they have to go out into the cold night -- a night in every way. Bilbo in that scene, huddled in a cloak, and silent, perhaps unable anymore to conjure up the slightest semblance of cheer, looks like the scene makes me feel -- dismal and shivery.

And again Jan's poem touched me very deeply! I always need a tissue when I read her works.

Me, too. :)
(Anonymous) at 2009-03-04 22:19 (UTC) (Link)
Thank you for these, Mechtild. I have enjoyed browsing your latest 'Rivendell' entries. This is one of my favourite film scenes, though as you say, poor Bilbo was rather made to look as though his separation from the Ring had not in the least lessened his desire for it. (To be fair, film-Bilbo
was not allowed the seventeen years that book-Bilbo was given.)

When reading the book passage, I have always thought that Bilbo's transformation was the Ring influencing Frodo's perception ~ an hallucination, almost ~ evidence that Frodo was already succumbing to it's power.

At least the film-scene reverts to the tender father/son relationship. It's very touching, and beautifully played by both actors. I always feel for Bilbo. How anxious he must have been waiting there in Rivendell, knowing Frodo is walking into the unknown to face the gravest danger (not least from the Ring itself), wondering if he would ever see him again.

Frodo is simply beautiful in these screencaps, and your commentary, as ever, is thoughtful and perceptive. Jan's words never fail to move me

'But all the while I sit and think
of times there were before,
I listen for returning feet
and voices at the door.'

I don't believe those words would be lost on Frodo either.

Thank you again. I hope the kitties are all well.
~ Blossom.
Mechtild
mechtild at 2009-03-04 22:37 (UTC) (Link)
(To be fair, film-Bilbo
was not allowed the seventeen years that book-Bilbo was given.)


Well-noted, Blossom! I had entirely forgotten about that radical time compression. However, even bearing that in mind, why would Bilbo have becomes massively worse in a year? In Bag End, when Gandalf pressured film Bilbo to give up the Ring, he lost his temper and behaved in a manner that caused Gandalf alarm, but he did respond to Gandalf's admonition (complete with impressive growth in size and vocal timbre), and recovered post haste. In Rivendell, he goes virtually bonkers at just the sight of the Ring, and he doesn't even "own" it any more. Ah, well, I guess a viewer could reason that in the first scene he felt less threatened because although he was being asked to give it up, it *was* still his. In the Rivendell scene, the context is that the Ring now "belongs" to someone else. Maybe that's supposed to make him worse?

I always feel for Bilbo. How anxious he must have been waiting there in Rivendell, knowing Frodo is walking into the unknown to face the gravest danger (not least from the Ring itself), wondering if he would ever see him again.

Gosh, that's a beautiful enlargement on the book scene. Bilbo certainly did not look very optimistic watching Frodo and his companions prepare to leave, the evening of their departure. Of course all these thoughts would be coming down on him, try as he might to be a hobbit of good cheer.

Blossom, off topic, but have you had time to prepare any more material for your beautiful Frodo website?
(Anonymous) at 2009-03-07 22:41 (UTC) (Link)
I do have several unfinished projects sitting on my hard-drive, Mechtild.

(Coincidentally, I have been working for a while on a slideshow using the 'Bilbo's Song' poem you quoted in this entry, but have run up against a problem which means I will have to re-think how I will present it on the site ~ arrgghh!)

I had been planning to update In Dreams soon, but RL issues are claiming my time, and will be for the next few weeks. Of course I will let you know as soon as I am able to add to the site.

~ Blossom.
Mechtild
mechtild at 2009-03-08 00:00 (UTC) (Link)
A slideshow using Bilbo's song? That would be WONDERFUL. What version are you planning on using? On the "Complete Recordings of RotK" soundtrack, Howard Shore has done a setting of Bilbo's song for boy's choir. It's very lovely and elegaic, but I confess that if I didn't already know the words I wouldn't understand what the boys are saying. Not being able to understand the words robs the song of much of its impact, making it merely pretty rather than moving. If you use it, I think you should find a way to show the words.

I had been planning to update In Dreams soon, but RL issues are claiming my time....

Hmmm. Sounds familiar. ;) Planning together for another poem post this year for March 25th (the anniversary of the fall of Barad-dur and the destruction of the Ring), I saw that I posted Rivendell Pt. 1 last March 25th. I've been working on the Rivendell series a year! I can tell you, it took me aback. Boy, was I unproductive, LJ-wise.



(Anonymous) at 2009-03-08 20:39 (UTC) (Link)
I have used Howard Shore's 'ROTK Complete Recordings' music, Mechtild, set to wallpaper-ish images I made ~ and yes, the words to the poem appear in the slideshow too. The problem I have is with the music ~ neither Photobucket or YouTube will allow the video to upload due to copyright issues. (I was informed by YouTube recently that the audio to my 'Into the West' video had been removed for copyright reasons, and now I see the video has disappeared altogether!) It seems the powers-that-be are cracking down on the use of music from the soundtrack, so I will have to present the project some other way. I should still be able to upload the slideshow ~ with the music ~ to Mediafire, as a downloadable file, but it won't be available to play on the page of the website. I have re-made the slideshow with an alternative music track, but it isn't the same ~ the Howard Shore theme is so lovely, and it's what I had in mind when I decided to present the poem in the form of a slideshow. I may simply put the images and verse on a scrolling page, with a link for the downloadable slideshow ~ but I cannot make my mind up.

You're planning an entry for March 25th? I'll look forward to that!

~ Blossom.
Mechtild
mechtild at 2009-03-08 21:33 (UTC) (Link)
Hmmm. These copyright issues are not particular to LotR. My daughter made little music videos for her favourite animated features, using music from here and there, and several have been taken down from YouTube for copyright infringement. I suppose it is a valid issue, all this use of material with no remuneration. But the way I look at it, it adds up to a tremendous amount of advertisting, sort of -- at least exposure -- and all for free -- that the artists and owners of the copyrights would have not otherwise got. Exposure and advertising which, if the pieces are good, only enhance fans' love for the music, and maybe even bring in more listeners.

Well, whatever you do, I am sure it is going to be *beautiful*.
(Anonymous) at 2009-03-09 22:20 (UTC) (Link)
There is a news item on my homepage this evening concerning YouTube.

http://uk.news.yahoo.com/22/20090309/tts-uk-youtube-music-13002c7.html

It seems many videos containing material owned by Warner Music Group have been disabled or removed. After reading that news item, I checked my YouTube account to find several more videos of mine have been disabled ~ all those using music owned by WMG. I would think Warner studios own the film images too ~ I hope they don't ever ban the use of
screencaps!

I'm sorry to hear your daughter's videos were taken down. I do agree with you that copyright infringement is a valid issue, on the other hand I think that ~ at least as far as LOTR goes ~ fans have spent a lot of money over the years on the various DVDs and soundtracks, as well as paying to see the films multiple times in the cinema. Most fans who make these videos do so out of love for the material, not for any monetary gain ~ and as you say, Mechtild, the videos do generate free publicity. (Not that LOTR needs any more promotion!)

~ Blossom.


Mechtild
mechtild at 2009-03-10 00:53 (UTC) (Link)
Oh, that's too bad! Maybe I'll mention it to my daughter, so she can steel herself to seeing more stuff missing when she next checks.

I am so sorry that any of your music videos have gone down. Thank goodness for me I have saved them all to my files at home, but what a shame for fans who might never see them except on a public site, whether because they are following a link, doing random browsing, or because they don't have their own machines. Whaaaah!

I don't like the LotR folks will ever think the films can't be further promoted. I'm sure they will be putting out new editions of the films for years. ;)
Estë   (or ST for short)
este_tangletoes at 2009-03-07 20:48 (UTC) (Link)
A most enjoyable series of essays, caps and poems. Thank you, Mechling and Jan.

The following says so much to me:

Promise
we shall

say
"fare well"

in tomorrow's grey dawn
and not

farewell.

Mechtild
mechtild at 2009-03-07 21:08 (UTC) (Link)
It's a lovely ending to the poem, Estëm, and to the poem cycle, too. Only when put into one continuous document, and read as such, did I realise how well the individual parts of "Rivendell Suite" worked together to make one [highly] satisfying whole.
melyanna_65
melyanna_65 at 2009-03-15 18:30 (UTC) (Link)
That's a very touching part of the story. I so love the scene in the movie, it's really sad and full of affection and desperation at the same time.

Sorry to be so late in replying, dear! I'd also like to let you know that I finally posted a couple of pics of my wee Red Book (as well as other books in my tiny Bag End).

You can find the entry here:

http://melyanna-65.livejournal.com/117971.html

*hugs*
Mechtild
mechtild at 2009-03-15 18:40 (UTC) (Link)
Thanks for stopping by, Melyanna, and thanks verymuch for the link! I will certainly take a look. I've been doing domestic projects all weekend and haven't been checking my f-list. :)
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